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Our Professors

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Of the more than 500,000 college professors in the world, only the top 1% are selected to teach one of The Great Courses. Our esteemed faculty includes award-winning experts and professors from the most respected institutions in the world, selected by our customers exclusively for their ability to teach.

  • Professor Michael Starbird Ph.D.

    The geometrical insights that I most like are those where different ideas come together unexpectedly to reveal some sort of a relationship that was not obvious at first.

    Professor Michael Starbird Ph.D.
    The University of Texas at Austin. University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • Professor Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius Ph.D.

    Modernity is a notoriously slippery concept, because, obviously, what is modern now will soon become the past, as time marches relentlessly forward.

    Professor Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius Ph.D.
    University of Tennessee. University of Pennsylvania

  • Professor Patrick Grim Ph.D.

    In the end, imagining a world of fact without value is quite nearly impossible for creatures like us. Our lives are woven in terms of the things we value.

    Professor Patrick Grim Ph.D.
    State University of New York, Stony Brook. Boston University

  • Professor Arthur T. Benjamin Ph.D.

    As a professor, I have always wanted to bring math to the masses. The Great Courses has helped make that wish come true.

    Professor Arthur T. Benjamin Ph.D.
    Harvey Mudd College. Johns Hopkins University

  • Professor Robert G. Fovell Ph.D.

    The English poet John Keats complained that by explaining how it worked, Sir Isaac Newton had 'unweaved the rainbow.' I could not disagree more. Our appreciation for Nature is enhanced by understanding her design.

    Professor Robert G. Fovell Ph.D.
    University of California, Los Angeles. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Ph.D.

    Of all the amazing things about the Universe, I think two stand above all the rest. One of them is that we know so much about the universe, but another is that there’s even more that we don’t know.

    Neil deGrasse Tyson Ph.D.
    Hayden Planetarium. Columbia University

  • Professor John Phillip Colletta Ph.D.

    Genealogy is much more than the enthralling detective work of unearthing a long-forgotten past: It’s a journey of self-discovery. The more you learn about who your ancestors were, the more you learn about who you are.

    Professor John Phillip Colletta Ph.D.
    Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Samford University. The Catholic University of America

  • Professor James Tanton Ph.D., Princeton University

    Our complex society demands not only mastery of quantitative skills, but also the confidence to ask new questions, to explore, wonder, flail, to rely on ones wits, and to innovate. Let's teach joyous and successful thinking.

    Professor James Tanton Ph.D., Princeton University
    The Mathematical Association of America. Princeton University

  • Professor Heidi Sormaz Yale University

    Yoga can have a transformative effect on your body and mind, helping you move from disease to ease in the ways that you breathe, move, and think.

    Professor Heidi Sormaz Yale University
    Certified Yoga Instructor. Yale University

  • Professor   Tim  Chartier Ph.D.

    Within the bits and bytes lies great potential to understand our past and predict future events. And this potential is being realized. Organizations of all kinds are devoting their energies to combing the ever-growing stores of high-quality data.

    Professor Tim Chartier Ph.D.
    Davidson College. University of Colorado, Boulder

  • Professor Seth Freeman J.D.

    Negotiation is learnable, and your success on it depends in part on things you already do well, like learning things.

    Professor Seth Freeman J.D.
    New York University. Columbia University

  • Professor Richard Kurin Ph.D.

    Objects have an amazing ability to connect us to history in a powerful, emotional, visceral way.

    Professor Richard Kurin Ph.D.
    The Smithsonian. University of Chicago

Watch Our Professors Teach
  • Tyson

    Why the Universe Is Flat
    Professor Neil deGrasse Tyson

  • Sartore

    Taking Fantastic Photos in Your Living Room
    National Geographic Fellow Joel Sartore

  • Restak

    How do Puzzles Help the Brain
    Professor Richard Restak

  • Kloss

    The Artistic Impact of van Gogh
    Professor William
    Kloss

  • Sapolsky

    Why Constant Stress is Killing You
    Professor Robert Sapolsky

  • Tuck

    Experiencing Ancient Greek Iconography
    Professor Steven L. Tuck

Watch Our Professor Teach
  • Why the Universe Is Flat - Neil deGrasse Tyson

  • Taking Fantastic Photos in Your Living Room - National Geographic Fellow Joel Sartore

  • How do Puzzles Help the Brain - Professor Richard Restak

  • The Artistic Impact of van Gogh - Professor William Kloss

  • Why Constant Stress is Killing You - Professor Robert Sapolsky

  • Experiencing Ancient Greek Iconography - Professor Steven L. Tuck