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Masterpieces of the Imaginative Mind: Literature's Most Fantastic Works

Masterpieces of the Imaginative Mind: Literature's Most Fantastic Works

Professor Eric S. Rabkin Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Course No.  2997
Course No.  2997
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Course Overview

About This Course

24 lectures  |  31 minutes per lecture
Many of literature's greatest works, from ancient myths to the works of Nobel laureates, rely on fantasy. Even when there has been a dominant preference for realism, generation after generation of readers have been drawn to stories of the fantastic not only for what they help us learn about ourselves as individuals and about our collective selves but also for what they show about our social values.

What can fairy tales and science fiction stories reveal about the psyches of individuals and nations? How does the literature of the fantastic reflect historical periods and preoccupations?

Join Professor Eric S. Rabkin, one of the world's foremost authorities on the literature of the fantastic and science fiction, as he takes you on a journey to explore

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Many of literature's greatest works, from ancient myths to the works of Nobel laureates, rely on fantasy. Even when there has been a dominant preference for realism, generation after generation of readers have been drawn to stories of the fantastic not only for what they help us learn about ourselves as individuals and about our collective selves but also for what they show about our social values.

What can fairy tales and science fiction stories reveal about the psyches of individuals and nations? How does the literature of the fantastic reflect historical periods and preoccupations?

Join Professor Eric S. Rabkin, one of the world's foremost authorities on the literature of the fantastic and science fiction, as he takes you on a journey to explore Masterpieces of the Imaginative Mind, Literature's Most Fantastic Works. You'll study strange tales of talking frogs and cannibal witches through Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Arthur C. Clarke's astonishing 2001: A Space Odyssey and beyond. Focusing on the early 19th century to contemporary times, Professor Rabkin casts a wide net for fantastic works and delves deeply into some of the most astounding. You'll learn about the works and times of Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Lewis Carroll, Franz Kafka, Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, J. R. R. Tolkien, Ray Bradbury, Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and more.

Once Upon a Time: The Lessons of Fairy Tales

In the early 19th century, two German brothers, Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, sought to demonstrate the deep significance of German culture. In the process they collected oral tales, which they believed were handed down from prehistory. These fairy tales, including "Hansel and Gretel," "Rapunzel," and "Snow White," are certainly tales of the fantastic, but they also have profound lessons to teach. What they teach us, however, is not always classic morality. One tale ("Rumpelstiltskin") shows that it is better to be beautiful than honest; another ("The Little Tailor") demonstrates that you can lie your way up the social ladder from peasant to king. Others, such as "Cinderella," offer consolations, ways of symbolically moving through difficult transitions in life.

Fantastic Works of Literature

The imaginative minds of the 19th century did not leave the fantastic to ancient folk tales. E. T. A. Hoffmann, for example, an energetic and creative German Romantic who died in 1822, created his own wildly fantastic tales. Both Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker ballet and the Offenbach opera Tales of Hoffmann are based on Hoffmann's tales. Hoffmann's stories even probe the psychology of fantasy itself and anticipate by a century Freud's theories of the power of the unconscious.

In the mid-19th century, writers such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe in the United States and Lewis Carroll in England explored their own notions of the fantastic and its powers on the reader. Hawthorne wrote fanciful stories about scientists who lose their way, often as a result of torturous love. The masterful Poe mixed fantastic situations and the torments of the human heart. Lewis Carroll's two Alice books are fantastic masterpieces, challenging our notions of language and reality.

Social Criticism and the Imaginative Mind

By the late 19th and early 20th centuries, imaginative minds were creating astonishing and bizarre worlds, weaving into the fabric of their narratives a significant strand of social criticism. H. G. Wells criticized Victorian sexual repression in The Invisible Man and imperialism in The Island of Dr. Moreau. Franz Kafka created fantastic tales, many of which were critical of society's institutions. Virginia Woolf wrote a novel Orlando critical of gender stereotyping in which a man lives from the 16th to the 20th century and emerges as a woman and mother.

View the Breadth of Modern Fantasy

Nor has fantasy literature slackened since the early 20th century. The famous French "New Novel" writer Alain Robbe-Grillet uses the fantastic to free readers from what he perceives as the unconscious constraint imposed by society and language. J. R. R. Tolkien created whole fantasy worlds with their own geographies and languages. Children's literature – Prof. Rabkin devotes a lecture to it – has been especially fertile with fantasy. And Magical Realism has blossomed with important works such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude and Laura Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate.

The Most Important Fantastic Genre Today

Professor Rabkin next delves into science fiction, the genre that claims plausibility against a background of science, while weaving in high adventure and intellectual excitement. In this half of the course, Dr. Rabkin shows why science fiction should be regarded as the most important fantastic genre today.

Professor Rabkin posits Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as the first true science fiction novel. You'll hear the story about the origins of that novel—a challenge to write the best ghost story – and you'll examine how Frankenstein explores themes of the struggle between the individual and society as well as the destabilizing possibilities of new knowledge. Europe remained the center of science fiction with such writers as Jules Verne and H. G. Wells, but that was about to change.

The Golden Age of Science Fiction

Early in the 20th century, a popular blend of exciting tales and scientific speculation developed in the democratic milieu of pulp fiction magazines: Even Edgar Rice Burroughs, the creator of Tarzan, wrote of rousing adventures on Mars. Soon, however, pulp fiction gave way to longer treatments. The writers Ray Bradbury and Robert A. Heinlein, along with Isaac Asimov and Britain's Arthur C. Clarke, emerged as important voices after World War II and brought science fiction tales into the mainstream of serious literature. You'll discover how each of these important writers explored the wondrous and disturbing implications of science and technology, their stories raising profound questions about humanity, life, and the future.

What Does the Future Hold?

In Professor Rabkin's final lectures you'll learn about important and enduring links between science fiction and religion, and also between science fiction and utopian novels such as 1984 and Brave New World. You'll explore the works of outstanding science fiction writers today, including Ursula Le Guin, who writes of fabulous new worlds in her literature for children and in science fiction. You'll learn how William Gibson's Neuromancer introduced the words "matrix" and "cyberspace" into our language. You'll learn about Philip K. Dick, who wrote the novel that inspired the movie Blade Runner.

Recapture the Joy of Childhood and Learn about the Literature of the Fantastic

From talking frogs to human robots, from Mad Hatters to mad scientists, Professor Rabkin's course offers an illuminating journey through the world's most fantastic and imaginative literature. Discover the magic, wonder, and profound significance of that literature.

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24 Lectures
  • 1
    The Brothers Grimm & Fairy Tale Psychology
    Professor Rabkin describes the course structure. In the first half, he will discuss fantastic literature from the earliest fairy tales to modern writers. In the second half, he will discuss the most significant genre of fantastic literature today: science fiction. He introduces the tales of the Brothers Grimm and explores the psychological truths in some of these stories. x
  • 2
    Propp, Structure, and Cultural Identity
    In 1928 Russian scholar Vladimir Propp discovered the structural universality of oral folk tales and devised several theories about them, including the notions that characters remain stable within a tale and that sequences of key events are the same across cultures. x
  • 3
    Hoffmann and the Theory of the Fantastic
    Professor Rabkin discusses E.?T.?A. Hoffmann, a romantic polymath and a spinner of true fantasy tales. Here Professor Rabkin defines the concepts of Romantic, Fantastic, and Fantasy. He also points out that long before Freud, Hoffmann posited a subconscious more powerful than the conscious. For Hoffmann, the achievement of art depends on both embracing and disciplining the fantastic. x
  • 4
    Poe—Genres and Degrees of the Fantastic
    Edgar Allan Poe used fantasy and created overpowering emotional effects for his readers by tapping into some of humanity's deepest fantasies and fears: for example, fear of death, fear of loneliness, and fear of one's self. Poe used art to accommodate his own fears, which, as Professor Rabkin points out, reflects what fairy tales have traditionally done. x
  • 5
    Lewis Carroll: Puzzles, Language, & Audience
    Lewis Carroll's Alice books make up a composite fantasy that captivates adults by inspiring us to rethink the roles of language, convention, and art in our lives. Here the fantastic is the world of Alice's own imagination. What are the limits of language and logic for understanding our world? x
  • 6
    H. G. Wells: We Are All Talking Animals
    Wells was once considered the pre-eminent novelist in English. In works like The Invisible Man, Wells shows how science offers a fantasy revenge against repression, both psychosexual and social. He argues for stories about issues that affect all people, not, as Henry James preferred, mere individuals. Wells analyzed the modern world but on a foundation of fairy tales. x
  • 7
    Franz Kafka—Dashed Fantasies
    Franz Kafka, an alienated man, recreated his life through parables of the fantastic. He drew his characters from the world of everyday experience and put them into settings that are familiar but situations that are fantastic. Professor Rabkin analyzes several stories, showing how Kafka criticizes social institutions as holding the potential for assistance but never giving any. x
  • 8
    Woolf—Fantastic Feminism & Periods of Art
    Virginia Woolf, who felt repressed in society because of her female sex, found consolation in the imaginative mind. Thus, in her fantastic novel Orlando, the protagonist begins as a male in the Elizabethan era and ends up a mother in the 1920s. Professor Rabkin examines Woolf's works, also touching on important writings of Emily Dickinson and Laurence Sterne. x
  • 9
    Robbe-Grillet, Experimental Fiction & Myth
    Alain Robbe-Grillet's "New Novel" The Erasers challenges our notion of reality. It is a retelling of the Oedipus myth, suggesting ways to confront and erase that myth. Professor Rabkin links Robbe-Grillet's experimental novel with discussions of style by Roland Barthes and the anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss. x
  • 10
    Tolkien & Mass Production of the Fantastic
    Professor Rabkin pays tribute to the Arthurian legends of England and recounts how J. R. R. Tolkien built on these fantasy materials to create his monumental trilogy Lord of the Rings. Professor Rabkin also discusses Tolkien's stories "Farmer Giles of Ham" and "Leaf by Niggle," showing how these tales too reflect Tolkien's deepest notions of politics and religion. x
  • 11
    Children’s Literature and the Fantastic
    In this lecture, Professor Rabkin examines children's literature, pointing out that the loose constraints on it invite the fantastic. Attention is paid to the works of Beatrix Potter, Margaret Wise Brown, Dr. Seuss, and Norton Juster. Dr. Rabkin notes that children's literature has contributed to fantasy and imagination that enrich adult literature, for example, George Orwell's Animal Farm. x
  • 12
    Postmodernism and the Fantastic
    Postmodernism, the current literary age, tends to view Nature as a matter of perspective, and shares important traits with fantasy literature. Indeed, works of Magical Realism, like those of Gabriel Garc'a Márquez, explore this view with other experimental fantastic literature. x
  • 13
    Defining Science Fiction
    Professor Rabkin concentrates on science fiction, defining it as a fantastic genre that claims its plausibility against a background of science. x
  • 14
    Mary Shelley—Grandmother of Science Fiction
    The 1818 novel, Frankenstein, is the first fully achieved science fiction novel. It grew out of a form of Romanticism called Gothicism that Shelley re-formed in a crucial new way. The novel is not about science but about what goes wrong with it when controlled by an egoist. x
  • 15
    Hawthorne, Poe, and the Eden Complex
    Significant Hawthorne stories reflect the important Eden Complex, a concept discovered by Professor Rabkin, one element of which is a character striving to be godlike or to twist nature for his own ends. Poe too used Eden Complex constructs, with female roles played by symbols such as a whirlpool, a pit, or a bed. x
  • 16
    Jules Verne and the Robinsonade
    Jules Verne combined love of science with satire. Most of his works are "Rob­in­sonades"—fantasies of intellectual conquest that, like the character Robinson Crusoe, sought to recreate alien circumstances in a European image. x
  • 17
    Wells—Industrialization of the Fantastic
    H.?G. Wells used science fiction as par­ables for political and philosophical criticism. In The Time Machine, Wells looks at the inhumanity of the British class system, and in War of the Worlds at British imperialism; he rebukes them both. x
  • 18
    The History of Utopia
    Utopian literature is fantastic and can assume three forms: a utopia can be pleasant, ambiguous, or horrible. Lately, most have been horrible—as in the novels We, 1984, and Brave New World—and they challenge readers to change society. x
  • 19
    Science Fiction and Religion
    Both science fiction and religion, although based on different notions of authority, try to better human life. Thus, science fiction sometimes uses religious speculation to explore spiritual concerns. x
  • 20
    Pulp Fiction, Bradbury, & the American Myth
    Edgar Rice Burroughs, who wrote about planets and unexplored continents, was a successful practitioner of pulp fiction. Ray Bradbury's groundbreaking The Martian Chronicles helped make the transformation from pulp fiction to subtler, more thoughtful science fiction. x
  • 21
    Robert A. Heinlein—He Mapped the Future
    Robert A. Heinlein's social imagination, his "hard science fiction" extrapolation, and superior craftsmanship, represents the best of a generation of American science fiction. His stories embody a strongly libertarian critique of modern American life. x
  • 22
    Asimov and Clarke—Cousins in Utopia
    Both Isaac Asimov (The Foundation series and I, Robot) and Arthur C. Clarke (2001: A Space Odyssey) were trained scientists as well as prolific authors. Both thought that humanity was perfectible and could achieve a good utopia—but first had to wake up to its shortcomings. x
  • 23
    Ursula K. Le Guin: Transhuman Anthropologist
    Ursula K. Le Guin is one of the most challenging writers of science fiction today. Her stories include genderless people, thus challenging gender stereotypes, and she also weaves Taoist philosophy into her novels. Le Guin's stories offer multiple changes of viewpoint to change attitudes toward language, human relations, and morality. x
  • 24
    Cyberpunk, Postmodernism, and Beyond
    Professor Rabkin's final lecture examines the latest trends in science fiction. He discusses William Gibson (Neuromancer); Philip K. Dick, whose fiction inspired the movie Blade Runner; New Wave; and Cyberpunk, an outgrowth of cybernetics and punk music. He ends by suggesting that we now live in a science fiction world. x

Lecture Titles

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Eric S. Rabkin
Ph.D. Eric S. Rabkin
University of Michigan
Dr. Eric S. Rabkin is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He earned his bachelor's degree at Cornell University and his Ph.D. at The University of Iowa. Professor Rabkin received the Golden Apple Award, given annually by students for the outstanding teacher at the University of Michigan. Other awards include the University Teaching Award, the LS&A Excellence in Education Award, and the University of Michigan Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award. He also received a fellowship from the American Council for Learned Societies, and research funding from the American Philosophical Society. Dr. Rabkin is well known for his large, popular lecture courses on science fiction and fantasy and for his many teaching innovations. His research examines fantasy literature, science fiction, and graphic narrative, among other topics. He is credited with more than 160 publications. His more than 30 books include Narrative Suspense; The Fantastic in Literature; Science Fiction: History, Science, Vision (with Robert Scholes); Teaching Writing That Works: A Group Approach to Practical English (with Macklin Smith); and Mars: A Tour of the Human Imagination.
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Reviews

Rated 3.7 out of 5 by 40 reviewers.
Rated 5 out of 5 by Enjoyable and provocative DVD Review: While even I admit to finding Professor Rabkin's lecture style a bit odd at first (Odd in what way, I hear you ask? Hard to put into words, just odd.), I stuck with him and the course and was rewarded. He clearly has a vast knowledge; deep love and respect for his subject; and a passion for teaching. What more can one ask? I particularly loved his take on one of my favorite authors, Poe, and his putting Poe's life in context; his lectures on later science fiction authors whet my appetite for their works as well. The journey was well worth the time, effort, and money spent. June 21, 2014
Rated 3 out of 5 by Not as good as imagined I apologize if I seem ambiguous here because that is how I feel about this course which reminded me of literature courses I took in college. I suppose that is appropriate and as it should be. But you must have a taste for visceral dissection of literature to enjoy this. Academics call kill the subject. Will I ever be able to enjoy another book of fantasy without thinking of themes, classifications and techniques? The professor seems to favor a Freudian analysis, meaning libido overtones. Little Red Riding Hood will never be the same again. There is nothing essentially wrong with this course, but in the end you might find yourself wondering-Why??? January 1, 2014
Rated 4 out of 5 by Enjoyable, entertaining, educational... DVD REVIEW ~ I'm not at all sure that analysing fantastic/fantastical literature from a Freudian, psychological or biblical point of view is totally valid. To use the vernacular, I simply do not buy that most authors, in writing their stories, purposefully insert all kinds of deep (often hidden) symbolism and metaphor, often alluding to Greek, Roman or biblical happenings or philosophies. [Joyce's Ulysses would be a major exception, of course!] Much of such analysis strikes me as the lecturer's forced interpretation or wishful thinking, and perhaps it even constitutes obfuscation. I have to add that I find objectionable the lecturer's remarks to the effect that you need to be especially clever/intellectual to catch the subtle references and metaphors: that sounds like plain academic snobbery. Nevertheless, the lectures were decidedly enjoyable, including those on works I was not very familiar with (within the first 12 lectures). The second half of this 24-lecture series had particular appeal to me: science fiction! Here I felt much more at home, with authors such as Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Shelley, Vernes and Wells. Dr Rabkin has a very steady, evenly-paced and rather slow presentation speed, with a serious demeanour which will not appeal to all. He lays very heavy emphasis on semantics, clearly likes to play with words, and I enjoyed that, too. The graphic content of the lectures is minimal but supplies some support. I almost always buy the DVD version; I like to see the lecturer in action. Note: the more recently-produced DVD series by Great Courses make excellent use of modern graphic technology, particularly in the sciences. I recommend Dr Rabkin's course, am happy to give a fantastic 4 STARS. August 31, 2013
Rated 1 out of 5 by Disappointing Inaccuracies I only managed to get through about three of these lectures before giving up. The introductory lectures were frustrating in their application of Freudian analysis and attempts to hang Christian symbolism on works where it didn't seem to fit. The Tolkien lecture seemed quite unfocused. I never did understand what the content of the lecture had to do with the "mass production" of the title. Excerpts were read in a rushed, sing-song manner, that, while appropriate to Tom Bombadil, quite took the pleasure out of the listening. What really disappointed was the lecture on C. S. Lewis. It seemed disjointed and superficial. But then it turned to just being inaccurate. Describing Eustace's time as a dragon #in light of the heresy this scene supposedly represents#, he misrepresented the details of the transformation in such a way as to miss #in my mind# the point of that whole section of the story. The shortcomings in the Lewis lecture left me feeling that I couldn't really continue to trust in the descriptions or analysis of other works in the course. Quite a disappointment, since most of the works on this list are on my to read list for the coming year. I know that it's hard to cover the vast topic of fantasy or science fiction in short lectures. But this course is just a miss. August 29, 2013
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