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The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness

The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness

Dr. Anthony A. Goodman M.D.
Montana State University
Course No.  1981
Course No.  1981
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Course Overview

About This Course

6 lectures  |  31 minutes per lecture

More than anything else, the cornerstone of a long, healthy, and happy life is the scientifically proven link between fitness and nutrition. When you take advantage of this powerful link—by practicing good nutritional eating habits and by keeping your body active—you're improving your chances of success in meeting your personal wellness goals, whether it's losing a few pounds or maintaining a balanced lifestyle.

But as Dr. Anthony A. Goodman knows all too well, the world is filled with popular and dangerously misleading myths about food and fitness. Whether promoted by businesses or celebrities, these myths and half-truths have rooted themselves in our everyday lives; so deeply, in fact, that it's often difficult to separate fact from fiction and to recognize when you're doing your body more harm than good.

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More than anything else, the cornerstone of a long, healthy, and happy life is the scientifically proven link between fitness and nutrition. When you take advantage of this powerful link—by practicing good nutritional eating habits and by keeping your body active—you're improving your chances of success in meeting your personal wellness goals, whether it's losing a few pounds or maintaining a balanced lifestyle.

But as Dr. Anthony A. Goodman knows all too well, the world is filled with popular and dangerously misleading myths about food and fitness. Whether promoted by businesses or celebrities, these myths and half-truths have rooted themselves in our everyday lives; so deeply, in fact, that it's often difficult to separate fact from fiction and to recognize when you're doing your body more harm than good.

Most important of all: As scientific knowledge has greatly expanded our understanding of how the human body works, many previously held ideas about fitness and nutrition have become severely outdated. "When things change for the better and are based on sound principles," says Dr. Goodman, "we need to be ready and able to make changes."

Discover the scientific truths that counter popular myths about nutrition and fitness with Dr. Goodman's insightful and rewarding course, The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness. Each of these six self-contained lectures explores in great depth the major myths, lies, and half-truths related to key components of fitness and nutrition. You'll

  • examine the pros and cons of various training and eating programs,
  • learn strategies that will help you discern the truth behind popular myths,
  • discover new ways to be healthy and physically active, and
  • enhance your ability to make educated decisions about your own health.

Learn the Truth about Diet and Exercise

Dr. Goodman has designed each of these lectures to be a focused look at central themes and subjects related to fitness and nutrition. Each lecture unpacks myths you may have some passing familiarity with—as well as some you may have always taken for granted as scientific truth.

  • Myths about foods to fuel your exercise: The best diet you can follow is three good meals a day. There is one single way to eat and exercise that works for almost everyone.
  • Myths about proper hydration: You can never drink too much water. You should never try to hydrate yourself with anything containing caffeine.
  • Myths about eating and exercise habits: If you eat food before bed, you'll gain more weight. Targeted exercises on certain areas of your body will help reduce fat only in those areas.
  • Myths about using vitamins and supplements: You cannot achieve optimal health without using multivitamins. If a supplement is natural, it's healthy and safe for you to use.
  • Myths about eating and exercise disorders: There's no harm in losing weight quickly. Starting a rigorous exercise program in childhood will prepare kids for athletic success later in life.
  • Myths about extreme physical activity: Athletes should always load up on carbohydrates before such activity. Given enough time and training, your body can adapt to any extreme environment.

With each of these and other myths, you'll learn some of the stories about how they emerged and the scientific knowledge that helped us break them down.

Improve the Way You Eat and Exercise

You'll also gain a wealth of practical tips and skills you can use every single day to improve and enhance the way you eat and exercise. And all of them are rooted in three simple concepts that Dr. Goodman sees as vital to overall health and wellness: science, moderation, and a willingness to listen to your body.

Here are just a few of the many pieces of solid advice and medically backed information Dr. Goodman has incorporated throughout The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness.

  • When working out, it's important to make sure your body has just a little more fluid and salt than it needs so that you can compensate for the losses you'll incur while you exercise.
  • Make your own sports drink—with just water, fruit juice, sugar, and salt—to save money and avoid the hidden health dangers from drinking too many commercial sports drinks.
  • One or two hours before exercising, eat a light meal of about 200 calories that is low in fat, moderate in proteins, and high in complex carbohydrates to help improve your performance.

These and the numerous other helpful hints in these lectures stem from Dr. Goodman's decades as a general surgeon, professor, and lifelong athlete. Dr. Goodman, whose courses on the human body and personal wellness have been wildly popular with Great Courses lifelong learners around the world, has carefully crafted this course to be a ready and accessible tool for better understanding this essential aspect of overall personal health.

So join him as he shows you, in just six fascinating lectures, powerful and true ways to transform your life for the better.

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6 Lectures
  • 1
    Fueling Up for Fitness Routines
    In this first engaging lecture, Dr. Goodman focuses on what specific foods you should eat to fuel your individual fitness program. Which body signals can help you determine the nutrition and fitness regimen that best fits your individual needs? When should you be skeptical of a particular diet’s claims? What foods should you eat before, during, and after exercises—and how much? x
  • 2
    Hydration for an Active Life
    Explore popular myths about hydration and fitness. These include, thirst is a poor indication of dehydration; athletes should avoid drinking caffeine because of its diuretic qualities; there’s no such thing as water toxicity; and bottled water is the purest, safest, and best-tasting source of water available. Along the way, you’ll learn the right ways to keep your body hydrated while you exercise. x
  • 3
    The Skinny on Exercise and Weight Loss
    Take a closer look at some popular and prevalent myths related to dieting, exercising, and weight loss. Your focus here is on a specific group of weight-loss myths, including the myth that you can control your weight by cutting fat, protein, or carbohydrates out of your diet, and that you can reduce fat selectively on your body by exercising specific areas prone to increased fat. x
  • 4
    Some Facts about Vitamins and Supplements
    Dr. Goodman, with his characteristic candor and insight, debunks myths about common and popular vitamins and dietary supplements—most of which you can find on the shelves of your local supermarkets and health food stores. Among myths you investigate in this lecture are multivitamins and their ability to maintain health, creatine and quercetin and their ability to enhance your physical performance, and sports and energy drinks and their effectiveness. x
  • 5
    Can You Get Too Much of a Good Thing?
    If a little diet and exercise is good for you, then more must always be better for you, right? Explore the dangers hidden in this enduring myth by taking a closer look at what happens when we go to extremes while dieting and exercising. Topics you’ll examine in this lecture include eating disorders, exercise addictions, and ways to recognize when your body needs to rest. x
  • 6
    Going to Extremes—The Smart Way
    Focus on debates related to extreme athletic events such as high-altitude mountain climbing and marathon running. As you delve into the half-truths and real scientific facts behind environmental adaptation, carbohydrate loading, and much more, you’ll get pointed advice on how to handle the extremes of exercise and endurance through preparation and the moderate intake of carbohydrates under the supervision of a sports medicine expert. x

Lecture Titles

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Anthony A. Goodman
M.D. Anthony A. Goodman
Montana State University
Dr. Anthony A. Goodman is Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Montana State University and Affiliate Professor in the Department of Biological Structure at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He earned his B.A. from Harvard College and his M.D. from Cornell Medical College and trained as a surgical intern and resident at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor. He completed his surgical training and served as chief resident at the Harvard Surgical Service of Boston City Hospital, the New England Deaconess Hospital, the Lahey Clinic, and Cambridge City Hospital. For 20 years, Dr. Goodman worked as a general surgeon in south Florida and served as Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Miami School of Medicine. In addition, he served as a surgeon with the U.S. Army Medical Corps and on the hospital ship for Project HOPE. He was also Visiting Professor of Surgery at the Christchurch, New Zealand, Clinical School of Medicine. Founder of the Broward Surgical Society, Dr. Goodman is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Surgery.
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Reviews

Rated 3.7 out of 5 by 21 reviewers.
Rated 5 out of 5 by The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness I enjoyed this course very much. Dr. Goodman was very easy to understand, intelligent and down to Earth. He made listening easy. The pictures along with it and book study helped also. I didn't realize the book and the lecture would be exact, so it made me able to listen and not really take notes, as I usually do. This is a very basic course that for general use is very good and helpful. January 5, 2014
Rated 5 out of 5 by Short and Informative This course aims to: • examine the pros and cons of various training and eating programs, • learn strategies that will help you discern the truth behind popular myths, • discover new ways to be healthy and physically active, and • enhance your ability to make educated decisions about your own health. Dr. Goodman discusses fitness and nutrition myths that will familiar to anyone who has been aware to ongoing very public discussion on these topics. He uses examples that are pertinent to the topic and serve to illustrative his points. The suggested readings, bibliography and website links contain good sources for further study and information. Reading the reviews was interesting. Some panned the course because it was too short, too basic, as if it were possible to give a complete degree program in nutrition and fitness in 3 hours. Others found it too focused on fitness, although the scope and goals of the course are adequately and accurately explained in the course description. This is a short course on a subject which gets much passionate attention in print, media, on the airwaves. The audiences are varied. From fitness and sports enthusiasts and those who aspire join their ranks, to weight conscious dieters and those motivated by appearance, health concerns and medical necessity. The reviews reflect this wide potential audience. Think it important to acknowledge that this course has a limited focus and it is only fair to judge it on the basis of what it is. It is not a course, on Nutrition; TGC has an excellent course of 36 lectures on that topic. Nor is it a course on Physiology and Fitness; a highly rated 36 lecture course is also available from TGC on that that topic. This short course does ably fulfill it's stated aims, IMO. It is inexpensive, coming at less than $20 during sales. It does a good job in covering a wide range of pertinent material in only 6 lectures with suggestions for further study. Five stars. September 18, 2013
Rated 1 out of 5 by good job but....... This course is good for athletes and NOT ordinary people. I just learnt that vitamins are NOT good and eating healthy and exercises ARE good. voila. I think lecturers need to address the title that they choose and stick to it. Sometime titles are misleading Otherwise I think the professor is quite knowledgeable and caring. April 22, 2013
Rated 1 out of 5 by Sorry, This One's a Clunker Are you over 50 and do you run marathons or engage in extreme sports? Then you're in the only target group that could conceivably enjoy this course. First, value. Some course can have 48 lectures and still be jam-packed. Goodman's has only six, but feels so thinly stretched that he has to keep padding the content with his own extreme sports resume. Next, content. Quite simply, it is not going to interest anyone whose interest lies in general nutrition or fitness. Except for hardcore bodybuilders, it probably won't interest young people at all. It will hold the interest of... well, only people who are exactly like Goodman in age and avocation. Finally, presentation. Goodman's voice is raspy and unpleasant. This could be forgiven if his lectures had any semblance of order. Other reviews have noted Goodman's tendency to ramble, but it's more than that. The rambling has a preachy edge to it, like that annoying brash cousin who can't stop droning loudly on about his summer in France long after everyone else at the Thanksgiving table has tuned him out. Give this one a pass. If the title interests you, go instead for Steven Novella's "Medical Myths, Lies and Half-Truths," a much more informative course on the topic. January 12, 2013
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