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Cultural Events

Cultural Events in:

Upcoming Cultural Events

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  • Lecture
    Second Thursday of each Month, 7:00 pm - Visitor Center Auditorium, Deering Estate at Cutler, 16701 SW 72 Ave., Miami
    In partnership with the Archaeological Society of Southern Florida, a non-profit, volunteer organization which acts as a support mechanism for the office of the Miami-Dade County Archaeologist, the Deering Estate at Cutler presents a monthly lecture, from September through June, highlighting unique and interesting connections to our past. This serves as a focal point for local archaeology enthusiasts and professionals in the field, and helps to promote knowledge and appreciation of native archaeological and historical sites in the South Florida area. See the website for each month's speaker and topic. This event is free to attend.
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  • Film
    Now Showing, Times Vary - IMAX Theater, Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave., Austin
    Our world- a magnificent blue planet, dotted with clouds and gleaming in the sunlight- is changing. From space, Earth is ablaze at night with the electric intensity of human habitation. It is within our power to protect the planet, and while we continue to explore our galaxy, we also develop a deeper connection to the place we all call home. From The Walt Disney Studios, IMAX, and acclaimed filmmaker Toni Myers (IMAX documentaries Blue Planet, Hubble 3D, and Space Station 3D,) A Beautiful Planet presents a breathtaking visualization of our world and a hopeful look into the future of humanity. Ticket price: $7-$9. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours — Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA
    War is a persistent attribute of human cultures through time, and weapons are crafted with a practical, and deadly, intent. Nearly as pervasive as war itself, is the practice of decorating objects used to wage it. Arts of War: Artistry in Weapons across Cultures is a new Peabody Museum exhibition that presents the varied beauty and craftsmanship of war objects drawn from cultures around the world. From maces, clubs, daggers, and spears, to shields, helmets, and entire suits of armor, this exhibition offers museum-goers more than 150 striking examples of weapons that are also extraordinary works of art. What would compel a warrior to deliberately imbue his weapon with beauty that stands in such stark contrast to its intended purpose? And why are war objects so much more common and elaborately decorated than those crafted for peace-making? Arts of War: Artistry in Weapons across Cultures probes intriguing questions, unveils the stories behind some of the most stunning war objects ever created, and explores the passion and purpose of the people who made them.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Law Building, Museum of Fine Arts, 1001 Bissonnet, Houston
    Islamic masterworks from Kuwait's renowned al-Sabah Collection came to the MFAH as part of a long-term collaboration with the cultural institution Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah (DAI). The privately held al-Sabah Collection is one of the greatest collections of Islamic art in the world, and the partnership initiates a historic exchange of objects, staff, and expertise. Among the highlights showcased in this display are spectacular Mughal jewelry, illuminated manuscripts, exquisite ceramics, and intricately decorated ceiling panels. More than 60 examples from the 8th to 18th centuries are on view, made in the Iberian Peninsula, North Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia. The collection also includes carpets, glass and metalwork, paintings, architectural fragments, scientific instruments, and works on paper. This exhibition marks the first in a renewable, five-year agreement that enables the MFAH to present the glorious achievement of Islamic visual culture in a comprehensive display. The legendary al-Sabah Collection was founded by Sheikh Nasser Sabah al-Ahmed al-Sabah and his wife, Sheikha Hussah Sabah al-Salem al-Sabah. The collection preserves and presents all aspects of Islamic art and comprises more than 30,000 pieces. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Concert
    November 20 and January 8, 11:00 am - The Edye at the Santa Monica College Performing Arts Center, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica, CA
    This popular series returns to satisfy your musical cravings. Curated by Robert Davidovici, winner of the Naumberg Competition and the Carnegie Hall International American Music Violin Competition, and featuring a melange of world-class guest musicians, Beethoven, Bagels & Banter is the perfect way to spend a Sunday morning: with great music, lively conversation and freshly made bagels. See the website for ticketing information.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Times Vary - Premier Exhibition Center, Atlantic Station, 265 18th St., Atlanta
    Bodies: The Exhibition provides an intimate and informative view into the human body. More than 200 actual human bodies and specimens, meticulously dissected and respectfully displayed, offer an unprecedented and wholly unique look into your amazing body. Come explore, experience and celebrate the wonder of the human form. Ticket price: $14-$24. See the website for additional information and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - The San Diego Museum of Man, Balboa Park, 1350 El Prado, San Diego
    In this thoughtful one-of-a-kind exhibit, you'll discover that cannibals aren't who you think they are. In fact, there's a good chance that your ancestors were cannibals. You may even have a few cannibalistic practices yourself. Ticket price: $7.50-$20 (includes general admission to the museum). See the website for additional information and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd., Forest Park, St. Louis
    During the first two decades of the 20th century, the St. Louis Street Department generated one of the most extensive troves of photographs ever taken of our city. Visitors to Capturing the City will experience a selection of these images of historic St. Louis in new eye-opening ways through this photography-based exhibit.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, 571 S. Kilgo Cir., Atlanta
    Baskets were one of the first art forms in the Americas, with basket fragments found in California and the Southwest dating to 9,400 years ago. Over the millennia, native North Americans developed elaborate techniques and intricate designs worked in local materials, from sweetgrass in Florida to black ash in the Northeast and deer grass in California, among many others. These materials were sacred to their makers and those who used these special containers. So too was the way each was made with coiling, especially poignant, symbolizing for many groups the path of human emergence from inside earth and the movement of the spirits between realms. This exhibition explores the intersection between material, making, and meaning in the fragile basketry art of the Southeast to the Southwest and up into the Arctic. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Center Hours - National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St., independence Mall, Philadelphia
    The National Constitution Center is proud to display one of the 12 surviving copies of the Bill of Rights. The Museum of We the People is the first institution in Pennsylvania to exhibit this historic document to the general public. it has been preserved as part of The New York Public Library's renowned research collection for over 100 years. The Bill of Rights is displayed alongside a first edition Stone Engraving of the Declaration of independence and a rare copy of the first public printing of the U.S. Constitution in the brand new George H.W. Bush Gallery. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of admission to the center.
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  • Exhibit
    Open October 23, Museum Hours - Beck Building, Museum of Fine Arts, 5601 Main St., Houston
    Emperors' Treasures: Chinese Art from the National Palace Museum, Taipei brings to Houston masterpieces that highlight the artistic and cultural contributions of eight imperial rulers of China, from the Song dynasty to the Qing dynasty. More than 160 works of art from the National Palace Museum offer a unique selection of paintings, calligraphy, bronzes, and decorative arts, such as porcelain, textiles, enamels, and jade. The exhibition presents examples of the finest craftsmanship and imperial taste, exploring the roles that eight emperors and one empress-who ruled between the early-12th-century Song dynasty and the early-20th-century Qing dynasty-had in the establishment and development of new artistic directions through the masterpieces they collected, commissioned, and in some cases created. Emperors' Treasures outlines how Chinese art came to evolve and flourish under Han Chinese, Mongol, and Manchu rulers. These remarkable objects have rarely been displayed outside of Taipei. Selections include an 11th-century white pottery vase that is a supreme example of the art of the Chinese potter; landscape paintings by court artists of the 12th century; a calligraphy by the Emperor Huizong in his distinctive style; a "chicken cup" produced in the mid-Ming period, for centuries the most sought after of all porcelain wares because of its superb quality; fine silk tapestries little known outside of China; and the Qianlong emperor's box of small treasures. See the website for ticketing information.
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  • Lecture
    First Wednesday of each Month, 5:30 to 7:00 pm - Locations Vary
    In conjunction with the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology, the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center welcomes guests to encounter science from an ethical viewpoint. Held on select Wednesdays, from October through June, this ongoing series brings together community leaders of various backgrounds to examine current scientific issues from diverse perspectives. Bring your own questions and join in the discussion! This event is free to attend, but registration is required. See the website for specific program and location information and to register.
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  • Exhibit
    Through December 31, Museum Hours - San Diego Museum of Art, Balboa Park, 1450 El Prado, San Diego
    In 2011, the Museum received an extraordinary gift from the Estate of Vance E. Kondon and Liesbeth Giesberger: 48 exceptional works by the leaders of the German and Austrian avant-garde in the first part of the 20th century, including Otto Dix, George Grosz, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele. Presented as a temporary exhibition in 2012, The San Diego Museum of Art's remarkable collection of German Expressionist paintings, drawings and prints is displayed in a specially dedicated Gallery 19 off the Upper Rotunda. Breaking with Academic tradition, progressive artists in Germany and Austria at the beginning of the 20th century looked to Paris for new ideas. Concerned with this new state of affairs, artists of the Brucke (Bridge) group sought to establish a genuinely German avant-garde. First in Dresden, then in Berlin, they pitted a revolutionary art and rebellious lifestyle against the accepted order. They longed, also, to escape the oppressive constraints of modern life. Like their Romantic predecessors, the artists of the Brucke regarded communion with nature as a source of spiritual renewal. While a commissioned work, such as Lovis Corinth's Portrait of Alexander Freiherr von Reitzenstein, could remain rooted in Post-Impressionism, members of the Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider) group, such as Alexej Jawlensky and Gabriele Munter, explored their predilection for bold, expressive colors. The collector, Vance E. Kondon, reflected on his own selections: Often, I'm asked why I started collecting. If you know the history of the early Brucke artists, you realize that they were poor, free spirits. They lived communally, and shared the same space, materials, ideas and hopes. They were openly sensual, and nudity was-at times-a way of life. They sought more freedom of emotional expression and less ritual and restraint. And they brought this approach to their art, using vibrant color, looseness of form, and themes from everyday life." Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission."
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours — Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy., Denver
    During the Spanish Colonial period in Latin America (1521–1850), precious gold and silver were crafted into elegant jewelry then embellished with emeralds from Colombia, coral from Mexico, and pearls from Venezuela. Wanting to demonstrate their wealth and status, people were painted wearing their finest dress and elaborate jewelry. Women were adorned with tiaras, necklaces with pendants, and prominent earrings. Men proudly displayed hat ornaments, rings, watch fobs, and chatelaines (decorative belt hooks) with small tools similar to the modern Swiss Army knife. Priests wore gold crucifixes and rosaries while nuns had miniature paintings of the Virgin Mary and saints crafted into brooches, called nun’s badges. Inlaid and lacquered chests and boxes were used to store these luxury goods. The portraits, furniture, and jewelry that are exhibited in Glitterati, drawn from the DAM’s world-renowned Spanish Colonial collection, tell the fascinating story of people and luxury possessions in the New World. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy., Denver
    Experience the extraordinary creativity of Venice from the mid-1400s to early 1500s, when artists forged a Renaissance style that was distinctly Venetian. Through this artistic evolution, the city became an internationally recognized model of pictorial excellence. Artworks in the exhibition emphasize how masters during this period-whose sensitivity toward color and light remained unparalleled for centuries-veered from traditional techniques and began using oil paint to experiment with depth, emotion, and dimension in their work. Glory of Venice features about 50 significant works, and provides visitors with a rare opportunity to experience 20 artworks from Venice's Gallerie dell'Accademia, which houses one of the greatest collections of Venetian Renaissance art in the world. Additional masterworks on view include paintings on loan from the Scuola Grande di San Rocco in Venice, and the Fondazione Magnani Rocca in Parma, Italy, as well as signature paintings in the DAM's collection. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Exhibit
    Open October 8, Museum Hours - The Museum of Russian Art, 5500 Stevens Ave, Minneapolis
    Intended to supplement the exhibition UNKNOWN FABERGE: New Finds and Rediscoveries, the display showcases a selection of etchings and lithographs from a private American collection. The display gives Minnesotan audiences the opportunity to view rare depictions of the members of the Romanov Dynasty, made by their contemporaries. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Saint Louis Art Museum, 1 Fine Arts Dr., Forest Park, St. Louis
    Spanish painter and printmaker Francisco de Goya's print series known as the Disasters of War stands as one of the major achievements in the history of European art. The Disasters responded to the French occupation of Spain by Napoleon Bonaparte between 1808 and 1814. It broke ground with the intensity of its focus on war's cruelties, yet the prints also shed light on the bravery of the Spanish people on the ground in the face of foreign occupation. Although Goya made the prints during and immediately after the war, they were not formally published until 1863, more than three decades after his death. Admission to this exhibit is free of charge.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St., Philadelphia
    Kourion, one of the ancient cities of the island of Cyprus, is the subject of this small exhibition curated by students for the Penn Year of Discovery", which draws on extensive excavation records, including archival photos and video footage, and artifacts, from the Penn Museum's excavations. Over the course of 20 years (excavations began in 1934 and continued with a war-time hiatus through 1954), Penn's team discovered artifacts dating from the Neolithic period through Roman times-a 5,000 year span of human occupation. Today, scholars continue to build on these findings as new research and technologies lead to a deeper understanding of the people of ancient Cyprus. Kourion at the Crossroads features a selection of about 25 objects from sites excavated at Kourion, explored through lenses of ancient daily life and death, religion, and trade. Taking their cue from Penn's "Year of Discovery" theme, the student curators took several artifacts from Kourion excavations to the Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM)-gaining new insights that are incorporated into the display. See the website for ticketing information."
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  • Discussion/Talk
    Select Thursdays, noon to 1:00 pm - Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta-Zaban Park, 5342 Tilly Mill Rd., Dunwoody, GA
    Bring a lunch and join local Rabbis for a lively monthly class and discussion. The JCC Lunch 'N Learn series features various Atlanta rabbis who are able to share unique perspectives on topics of their choice. Topics include: the weekly Torah portion, current events, Israel, Jewish customs and ceremonies, Jewish holidays, and more. This event is free to attend, but registration is required. See the website for a full schedule of class dates and to register.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St., Philadelphia
    Ancient cultures believed in magic and it permeated their daily lives. In ancient Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, and Egypt, practitioners of magic use symbolic words, images, or rituals to achieve desired outcomes through supernatural means. Through magical acts, they attempted to control supernatural powers-gods, demons, spirits, or ghosts-to accomplish something beyond the scope of human capabilities. Explore a presentation of objects associated with magical practices from the Penn Museum's own collections in Magic in the Ancient World. See the website for ticketing information.
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  • Exhibit
    Open October 16, Museum Hours - Kimbell Art Museum, 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth
    This groundbreaking exhibition is the first ever devoted to the young genius of Claude Monet. Monet: The Early Years will feature approximately 60 paintings from the first phase of the artist's career, from his Normandy debut in 1858 until 1872, when he settled in Argenteuil, on the River Seine near Paris. Through the 1860s, the young painter-still in his twenties-absorbed and transformed a variety of influences, as the lessons of the Barbizon school and his mentor Boudin gave way to the challenges posed by his friends Manet, Pissarro, Renoir and Sisley. On the strength of his invention of a highly personal and distinctive mode of painting, the young man positioned himself as an artist to be recognized and to be reckoned with. Monet: The Early Years examines this period in depth, through the greatest examples of his painting-drawn from museums in the United States, Europe and Japan. The exhibition will enrich our understanding of the ways in which Monet's artistic innovation and personal ambition evolved in tandem. See the website for ticketing information.
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  • Film
    Open October 14, Times Vary - Phipps IMAX Theater, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver
    The ancient past comes to spectacular life in this fascinating look at Egypt in the time of the pharaohs. Part historic journey and part forensic adventure, the film follows researchers and explorers as they piece together archaeological discoveries and genetic clues from mummies. One such expert highlighted in the film is prominent Egyptologist and mummy specialist Dr. Bob Brier, senior research fellow at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University, and The Great Courses professor for History of Ancient Egypt and Great Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. In the ancient Egyptian tradition, Dr. Brier mummified a modern body donated to science. These carefully detailed reenactments open a window into the daily life of antiquity and the unique process of Egyptian mummification in this cinematic adventure 3,000 years on the making. Presented in 2D. See the website for show times and ticketing information.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Witte Museum, 3801 Broadway in Brackenridge Park, San Antonio
    Mark your calendars for Earth Explorers, a world renowned, interactive exhibition with six immersive environments: Base Camp, North/South Pole, Oceans, Rain Forests, Mountains and Caves, and Savannahs. Follow six National Geographic scientists on their adventures through Earth's diverse eco-zones and discover what it takes to survive and study in some of the planet's most extreme conditions. Through augmented reality and hands-on interactives, you will be surrounded by the plants and animals in each ecosystem and experience the life of a scientist or an explorer discovering the wonders of Earth.
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  • Film
    Open October 8, Times Vary - IMAX Theater, Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave., Austin
    The U.S. National Park Service turns 100 years old in 2016, marking a major milestone in the preservation of America's wild, untamed spaces. National Parks Adventure brings the magnificence of these landscapes to the giant screen and takes audiences on the ultimate off-trail adventure into the mountains and canyons of our great outdoors. Ticket price: $7-$9. See the website for show times and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - The Oriental institute, 1155 E. 58th St., Chicago
    This exhibit presents the afterlife of Persepolis as a travel destination, site of archaeological exploration, and overall wonder of the ancient world. Photographs taken during the Oriental institute's Persepolis Expedition (1931 - 1939) capture the magnitude and grandeur of the ruins of this center of the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550 - 330 B.C.). iconic large-scale prints from this collection displayed in the exhibit portray the multitude of columns, grand portals and staircases, and elaborate stone carving of the site's majestic audience halls and residential palaces. They also emphasize the contrast between the built and natural landscapes that has come to define this legendary site. The pairing of these photographs with quotations from travelers to the site allows visitors to feel as if they themselves are standing amidst the ruins of Persepolis. A multimedia display featuring three-dimensional models of the architecture of Persepolis and surrounding topography demonstrate the continued contribution of this collection of archival photographs, as well as satellite imagery, to studies of spatial analysis and the ongoing importance of the site of Persepolis to the study of ancient iran. Admission to the museum is free, but a donation of $10 per adult or $5 per child is suggested and appreciated.
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  • Lecture
    January 6, February 3, and March 3, 6:30 pm — Meeting Room, Kenton Branch–Multnomah County Library, 8226 N. Denver Ave., Portland
    Psychobiography is the analysis of historically significant lives through the use of psychological theory and research. Its aim is to understand persons, and to uncover the private motives behind public acts, whether those acts involve the making of art or the creation of scientific theories, or the adoption of political decisions. William Todd Schultz is a world renowned psychobiographer and personality scientist. He is the author of three books exploring connections between psychology and art: one on writer Truman Capote (Tiny Terror), one on photographer Diane Arbus (An Emergency in Slow Motion), and one on musician Elliott Smith (Torment Saint). He has also written articles or book chapters on Sylvia Plath, Kafka, Jack Kerouac, Oscar Wilde, Roald Dahl, James Agee, and others. He oversees the Oxford University Press book series Inner Lives, and his essays have appeared in Slate, Huffington Post, Salon, the Spectator, and other outlets. See the website for each evening's topic. This event is free to attend.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - The Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th St., Philadelphia
    Explore a cutting-edge collection of robots from around the world in Robot Revolution, a new exhibit supported by Google.org with additional major support from The Boeing Company. Meet the remarkable machines of the future with this immersive experience of unprecedented robotic proportions and dive into the next generation of technology. Interact with robots that have rarely been shown to the public-from soccer-playing 'bots to impressive humanoids- and witness how these amazing machines can change how we live, work and play. Go head to head with a tic-tac-toe-playing 'bot, challenge a robot to a game of 21, or feel a therapeutic baby seal robot react to your touch! Robot Revolution offers specific hands-on activities for guests while delving into the four main aspects of robotics: Cooperation - Discover how robots can work with humans; Smarts - Identify how these machines are able to sense, plan and then act; Skills - Learn about the skills robots possess that mimic-and often surpass-human capabilities; and Locomotion - Explore the ways machines can move. In Robot Revolution, step into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity, but an amazing asset. Learn from them, play with them, and discover how their astonishing skills will change our lives for the better. Ticket price: $7.95-$29.95 (includes general admission to the museum). See the website for additional information and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Hwy., Pacific Palisades, CA
    Roman decor was unique for the elaborate mosaic floors that transformed entire rooms into spectacular settings of vibrant color, figural imagery, and geometric design. Scenes from mythology, daily life, the natural world, and spectacles in the arena enlivened interior spaces and reflected the cultural ambitions of wealthy patrons. Drawn primarily from the Getty Museum's collection, this exhibition presents the artistry of mosaics as well as the contexts of their discovery across Rome's expanding empire-from its center in Italy to provinces in North Africa, southern Gaul, and ancient Syria. Admission to the exhibit is free of charge.
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  • Tour
    July 30-August 11 - Locations Vary
    Connect with the peoples and places of the British Isles and bask in the region’s luminous seascapes, green grass and golden hills on Bright Horizons 32. Travel roundtrip Copenhagen to England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Scotland with scientific experts and science buffs on HAL’s Zuiderdam. Join Scientific American in an adventure in lifelong learning. Deepen your knowledge of the histories and cultures of a region of clans and castles. Venture into cities where scientists and entrepreneurs have been propelling discoveries, applied technologies, and economies since the Industrial Revolution. While at sea get state of the art astronomy, physics, and forensic science and enjoy great discussions and engaging dinner table conversation. Experience the smell of rain on Scottish pines, the speed of Irish wit, the glow of Liverpool’s civic pride and the freshness of Belfast’s cuisine. Hike with a friend and linger in landscapes that foster reflection. Gather new food for thought and absorb scientific progress with the experts. Among the experts is Dr. Richard Wolfson, Benjamin F. Wissler Professor of Physics at Middlebury College and The Great Courses professor for Understanding Modern Electronics, Einstein's Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: Modern Physics for Non-Scientists, 2nd Edition, Physics and Our Universe: How It All Works, Earth's Changing Climate, and Physics in Your Life. Let us take care of the details so you can unwind. Please join us! See the website for full pricing information, a detailed itinerary, and to register for the trip.
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  • Book Release/Signing/Reading
    First Tuesday of each Month, 6:45 to 8:30 pm — Upstart Crow Bookstore and Coffeehouse, Seaport Village, 835 W. Harbor Dr., San Diego
    A free open reading of the best scenes from Shakespeare starring...YOU!! Join in the reading or just come along for the fun and interactive listening experience in a great bookstore and coffee house setting. Grab a latte and perhaps a sticky bun and away we go. See the website for each month's featured piece.
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