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  • Learning Statistics: Concepts and Applications in R

    Professor Talithia Williams, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Taught by Professor Talithia Williams of Harvey Mudd College, this course surveys college-level statistics through dozens of exercises conducted in R, a free statistical programming language with millions of users worldwide. From describing and visualizing the data you have, to methods such as ANOVA and multiple regression for reaching broader inferences, you learn the most widely used statistical measures, concepts, and techniques.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Learning Statistics: Concepts and Applications in R
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      How to Summarize Data with Statistics
      Confront how ALL data has uncertainty, and why statistics is a powerful tool for reaching insights and solving problems. Begin by describing and summarizing data with the help of concepts such as the mean, median, variance, and standard deviation. Learn common statistical notation and graphing techniques, and get a preview of the programming language R, which will be used throughout the course. x
    • 2
      Exploratory Data Visualization in R
      Dip into R, which is a popular open-source programming language for use in statistics and data science. Consider the advantages of R over spreadsheets. Walk through the installation of R, installation of a companion IDE (integrated development environment) RStudio, and how to download specialized data packages from within RStudio. Then, try out simple operations, learning how to import data, save your work, and generate different plots. x
    • 3
      Sampling and Probability
      Study sampling and probability, which are key aspects of how statistics handles the uncertainty inherent in all data. See how sampling aims for genuine randomness in the gathering of data, and probability provides the tools for calculating the likelihood of a given event based on that data. Solve a range of problems in probability, including a case of medical diagnosis that involves the application of Bayes' theorem. x
    • 4
      Discrete Distributions
      There's more than one way to be truly random! Delve deeper into probability by surveying several discrete probability distributions-those defined by discrete variables. Examples include Bernoulli, binomial, geometric, negative binomial, and Poisson distributions-each tailored to answer a specific question. Get your feet wet by analyzing several sets of data using these tools. x
    • 5
      Continuous and Normal Distributions
      Focus on the normal distribution, which is the most celebrated type of continuous probability distribution. Characterized by a bell-shaped curve that is symmetrical around the mean, the normal distribution shows up in a wide range of phenomena. Use R to find percentiles, probabilities, and other properties connected with this ubiquitous data pattern. x
    • 6
      Covariance and Correlation
      When are two variables correlated? Learn how to measure covariance, which is the association between two random variables. Then use covariance to obtain a dimensionless number called the correlation coefficient. Using an R data set, plot correlation values for several variables, including the physical measurements of a sample population. x
    • 7
      Validating Statistical Assumptions
      Graphical data analysis was once cumbersome and time-consuming, but that has changed with programming tools such as R. Analyze the classic Iris Flower Data Set-the standard for testing statistical classification techniques. See if you can detect a pattern in sepal and petal dimensions for different species of irises by using scatterplots, histograms, box plots, and other graphical tools. x
    • 8
      Sample Size and Sampling Distributions
      It's rarely possible to collect all the data from a population. Learn how to get a lot from a little by bootstrapping," a technique that lets you improve an estimate by resampling the same data set over and over. It sounds like magic, but it works! Test tools such as the Q-Q plot and the Shapiro-Wilk test, and learn how to apply the central limit theorem." x
    • 9
      Point Estimates and Standard Error
      Take your understanding of descriptive techniques to the next level, as you begin your study of statistical inference, learning how to extract information from sample data. In this lecture, focus on the point estimate-a single number that provides a sensible value for a given parameter. Consider how to obtain an unbiased estimator, and discover how to calculate the standard error for this estimate. x
    • 10
      Interval Estimates and Confidence Intervals
      Move beyond point estimates to consider the confidence interval, which provides a range of possible values. See how this tool gives an accurate estimate for a large population by sampling a relatively small subset of individuals. Then learn about the choice of confidence level, which is often specified as 95%. Investigate what happens when you adjust the confidence level up or down. x
    • 11
      Hypothesis Testing: 1 Sample
      Having learned to estimate a given population parameter from sample data, now go the other direction, starting with a hypothesized parameter for a population and determining whether we think a given sample could have come from that population. Practice this important technique, called hypothesis testing, with a single parameter, such as whether a lifestyle change reduces cholesterol. Discover the power of the p-value in gauging the significance of your result. x
    • 12
      Hypothesis Testing: 2 Samples, Paired Test
      Extend the method of hypothesis testing to see whether data from two different samples could have come from the same population-for example, chickens on different feed types or an ice skater's speed in two contrasting maneuvers. Using R, learn how to choose the right tool to differentiate between independent and dependent samples. One such tool is the matched pairs t-test. x
    • 13
      Linear Regression Models and Assumptions
      Step into fully modeling the relationship between data with the most common technique for this purpose: linear regression. Using R and data on the growth of wheat under differing amounts of rainfall, test different models against criteria for determining their validity. Cover common pitfalls when fitting a linear model to data. x
    • 14
      Regression Predictions, Confidence Intervals
      What do you do if your data doesn't follow linear model assumptions? Learn how to transform the data to eliminate increasing or decreasing variance (called heteroscedasticity), thereby satisfying the assumptions of normality, independence, and linearity. One of your test cases uses the R data set for miles per gallon versus weight in 1973-74 model automobiles. x
    • 15
      Multiple Linear Regression
      Multiple linear regression lets you deal with data that has multiple predictors. Begin with an R data set on diabetes in Pima Indian women that has an array of potential predictors. Evaluate these predictors for significance. Then turn to data where you fit a multiple regression model by adding explanatory variables one by one. Learn to avoid overfitting, which happens when too many explanatory variables are included. x
    • 16
      Analysis of Variance: Comparing 3 Means
      Delve into ANOVA, short for analysis of variance, which is used for comparing three or more group means for statistical significance. ANOVA answers three questions: Do categories have an effect? How is the effect different across categories? Is this significant? Learn to apply the F-test and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test. x
    • 17
      Analysis of Covariance and Multiple ANOVA
      You can combine features of regression and ANOVA to perform what is called analysis of covariance, or ANCOVA. And that's not all: Just as you can extend simple linear regression to multiple linear regression, you can also extend ANOVA to multiple ANOVA, known as MANOVA, or multivariate analysis of variance. Learn when to apply each of these techniques. x
    • 18
      Statistical Design of Experiments
      While a creative statistical analysis can sometime salvage a poorly designed experiment, gain an understanding of how experiments can be designed in from the outset to collect far more reliable statistical data. Consider the role of randomization, replication, blocking, and other criteria, along with the use of ANOVA to analyze the results. Work several examples in R. x
    • 19
      Regression Trees and Classification Trees
      Delve into decision trees, which are graphs that use a branching method to determine all possible outcomes of a decision. Trees for continuous outcomes are called regression trees, while those for categorical outcomes are called classification trees. Learn how and when to use each, producing inferences that are easily understood by non-statisticians. x
    • 20
      Polynomial and Logistic Regression
      What can be done with data when transformations and tree algorithms don't work? One approach is polynomial regression, a form of regression analysis in which the relationship between the independent and dependent variables is modelled as the power of a polynomial. Step functions fit smaller, local models instead of one global model. Or, if we have binary data, there is logistic regression, in which the response variable has categorical values such as true/false or 0/1. x
    • 21
      Spatial Statistics
      Spatial analysis is a set of statistical tools used to find additional order and patterns in spatial phenomena. Drawing on libraries for spatial analysis in R, use a type of graph called a semivariogram to plot the spatial autocorrelation of the measured sample points. Try your hand at data sets involving the geographic incidence of various medical conditions. x
    • 22
      Time Series Analysis
      Time series analysis provides a way to model response data that is correlated with itself, from one point in time to the next, such as daily stock prices or weather history. After disentangling seasonal changes from longer-term patterns, consider methods that can model a dependency on time, collectively known as ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) models. x
    • 23
      Prior Information and Bayesian Inference
      Turn to an entirely different approach for doing statistical inference: Bayesian statistics, which assumes a known prior probability and updates the probability based on the accumulation of additional data. Unlike the frequentist approach, the Bayesian method does not depend on an infinite number of hypothetical repetitions. Explore the flexibility of Bayesian analysis. x
    • 24
      Statistics Your Way with Custom Functions
      Close the course by learning how to write custom functions for your R programs, streamlining operations, enhancing graphics, and putting R to work in a host of other ways. Professor Williams also supplies tips on downloading and exporting data, and making use of the rich resources for R-a truly powerful tool for understanding and interpreting data in whatever way you see fit. x
  • The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy

    Professor Patrick N. Allitt, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Designed to shine a light on the American frontier, The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy reveals the grit and grandeur of an epic period in U.S. history. In 24 lectures, award-winning Professor Patrick N. Allitt uncovers new historical angles on everything from the last stand at the Alamo to the Oregon Trail to the creation of America’s first national parks.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Westward the Course of Empire
      What are some of the ways we think about the American West? How did this vast, fascinating region come into being, and how was it shaped by centuries of myth-making? What is it about westward expansion that has fascinated every generation of Americans? These and other questions are the topic of this introductory lecture. x
    • 2
      The West in the Colonial Era
      To understand the history of the American West, you have to understand the mark left by its earliest colonists. Among those you'll encounter here are the Spaniards (who introduced horses), the French (who developed a complex trade system), and the English (who, ironically, had little interest at first in colonizing west of the Appalachians). x
    • 3
      Venturing beyond the Appalachians
      After the Revolutionary War, the land between the Appalachians and the Mississippi became part of the new republic. How was this territory organized? As you'll learn, it started with the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, which created a set of new rules that came into conflict with complex old realities. x
    • 4
      Discoveries of Lewis and Clark
      Follow the fascinating journey of the two explorers who mapped the Louisiana Purchase between 1804 and 1806. Along the way, you'll learn how Lewis and Clark fit into the tradition of explorers looking for a water route to the Pacific, and you'll consider the political (and geographic) history of the Louisiana Purchase. x
    • 5
      The Fur Trade and the Mountain Men
      Fur traders and mountain men played an integral part in exploring and mapping the American West. Here, Professor Allitt reveals why fur was such a precious commodity; how John Jacob Astor dominated the American fur trade; and how famous mountaineers like Jedediah Smith, Jim Bridger, and Kit Carson became legends. x
    • 6
      Trail of Tears
      Turn now to one of the most dismal episodes in the story of the American West: the forced migration of the Five Civilized Tribes" (Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, and Seminole) under the Indian Removal Act of 1830. It was this ordeal that the Cherokee came to call the "Trail of Tears."" x
    • 7
      Struggles of the Plains Indians
      From 1830 to 1890, the lives of the Plains Indians changed irrevocably. Topics include our sources for the early history of the Plains Indians (including portraits and archaeology), the importance of buffalo and horses to life on the Great Plains, and two visitors' perspectives on America's treatment of the Plains Indians. x
    • 8
      Rebellious Texas and the Alamo
      Get the full story behind the last stand at the Alamo and the story of the Texas republic. What led to tensions between the Mexican government and the growing United States? Why is the idea of rebellion so crucial to the myth of Texas? How did the territory eventually join the United States? x
    • 9
      Traveling the Oregon Trail
      The Oregon Trail has become a symbol of westward migration. In this lecture, Professor Allitt invites you to consider the challenges of the journey, as they were experienced by thousands of travelers. Among the most exceptional were Brigham Young's Mormons, fleeing persecution back East as they headed to Utah. x
    • 10
      Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War
      In 1846, the United States went to war with Mexico and, as a result, gained the whole of what is now the nation's southwest region. Welcome to the era of Manifest Destiny," which, as you'll learn, set the stage for the future of California, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico." x
    • 11
      The California Gold Rush
      The California Gold Rush transformed the politics, demographics, and economy of the United States. It also, for the first time, gave the American West an irresistible mass appeal. Discover how the gold rush accelerated westward expansion and, in the process, established some of the first truly multicultural American communities. x
    • 12
      Bleeding Kansas and Civil War in the West
      Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, giving new states the right to decide their relationship with slave labor. Explore how this event led to a period of chronic anarchy and low-level warfare on the frontier, and how the American Civil War played out in the western states and territories. x
    • 13
      Building the Transcontinental Railroads
      For Professor Allitt, the great dividing line in the story of the American West is the construction of the transcontinental railroads, which did more than anything else to link the West with the Eastern states from which they'd emerged. Go inside the myths-and startling realities-of this decisive moment. x
    • 14
      Cowboys and Cattle Drives
      There is no greater symbol of the American West than the cowboy. But who were the cowboys, exactly? What were their everyday lives like? What did it take to go on a cattle drive along the Chisolm Trail? And why did the arrival of the farming frontier bring an end to the open range? x
    • 15
      Homesteaders on the Plains
      With the Homestead Act of 1862, public lands became available for anyone willing to settle and farm them. Enter the homesteaders. Explore the frustrations they faced in trying to cultivate the Great Plains, what fiction reveals about their emotions, and how farming difficulties led to the rise of the People's Party, or Populists. x
    • 16
      Little Bighorn and Wounded Knee
      Examine the period from 1865 to 1890, which marked the end of the Native American resistance to white domination. Two events form the core of this lecture. The first: the massacre of General Custer's cavalry at the Battle of Little Big Horn. The second: the massacre of the Lakota at the Battle of Wounded Knee. x
    • 17
      Life in Western Towns and Cities
      Survey the five main types of towns that developed in the American West: Spanish towns, mining towns, farming towns, railroad towns, and the Pacific coast cities. Three cities you'll explore in depth are Salt Lake City, laid out in 1847; Chicago, the central metropolis of the West; and the great port city of San Francisco. x
    • 18
      John Wesley Powell and the Desert Southwest
      Twenty years after the end of the Mexican War, thousands of square miles of desert land the U.S. received had yet to be mapped and settled. That's where John Wesley Powell came in, whose report on these arid regions sparked the rise of irrigation farming techniques that would lead to unimaginable bounty. x
    • 19
      Women in the Wild West
      What was life like for everyday women in the American West? Some were prostitutes. Others were missionaries. Others still were working- and middle-class women trying to recreate their lives back East. Ultimately, as you'll discover, the experience, while enlarging women's sphere of influence, was nevertheless a conservative one: to create a stable home. x
    • 20
      From Territories to Western States
      Imperfect and violent-two words to describe how Western territories were created and then transformed into states. In this lecture, go inside this intriguing, often misunderstood process, from the role of influential businesspeople to the copying of other state constitutions to the efforts to give women the right to vote. x
    • 21
      Western Violence, Law, and Order
      There is no doubt that the American West was a violent place. Why was this so? What kept the region from chaos and civil war? Professor Allitt's brief survey of violence explores the rise of vigilante justice, race riots against Mexicans and Chinese, and class conflict at coalmines. x
    • 22
      Protecting Yellowstone and Yosemite
      The American West is home to a magnificent series of national parks, two of the earliest of which (and, arguably, the greatest) are Yellowstone and Yosemite. Discover through these case studies how the idea of a park system came into existence through government action and the dedication of conservationists. x
    • 23
      Mythology of the American West
      Go inside the mythology of the American West, which kept the frontier alive after the U.S. Census Bureau declared in 1890 that it had disappeared. Examine historian Frederick Jackson Turner's influential frontier thesis." Learn about the contributions of novelist Owen Wister and painter Frederic Remington. Also, explore the main categories of Western movies." x
    • 24
      Winning the West?
      When thinking about the American West, Professor Allitt stresses a balanced view that encompasses both the achievements and the sufferings of this period in American history. It's an insightful conclusion to the grand, fascinating, sometimes troubling story of how exactly America became a vast nation stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific in just a century. x
  • Startup Library: Painting with Watercolors

    Kateri Ewing, Watercolor Expert

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Color your world with watercolors! Join expert Kateri Ewing in this comprehensive beginner’s class as she helps you navigate all the basics. You’ll explore a range of tools and supplies, essential techniques, plus hands-on demonstrations and so much more.

    View Lecture List (14)
    14 Lectures  |  Startup Library: Painting with Watercolors
    Lecture Titles (14)
    • 1
      What You Need: Watercolor Paints
      Meet Kateri Ewing and ground yourself in the fundamentals of watercolor paint. Kateri examines key topics, including staining and granulating effects, lightfastness ratings, pigment numbers and more. x
    • 2
      What You Need: Brushes
      Kateri goes over the different types of brushes and their various qualities, including the best beginner-friendly ones, as well as care and storage instructions. x
    • 3
      What You Need: Paper
      Explore the various aspects of paper and the formats it comes in, from pads and blocks to giant tearable sheets. Kateri helps you choose the right kind of paper for your project, then shows you how to stretch it to avoid warping and bubbling. x
    • 4
      What You Need: Palettes & Extras
      Kateri reviews the last few items you need to start painting, including palettes, erasers, masking fluid, easels and more. x
    • 5
      Methods: Basic Brushstrokes
      Explore a number of mark-making techniques with two types of brushes: flat and round. Kateri demonstrates how to lift pigment, create sharp edges and make a variety of lines, including twisting, flat, thick-to-thin and more. x
    • 6
      Methods: Washes
      Harness the power of water and pigment for stunning results every time! Here, Kateri teaches you the basics of creating washes. Find out how to make, or avoid, blooms, how to fade edges and more. x
    • 7
      Methods: Paint Application
      Explore the two primary watercolor methods: wet-in-wet and wet-on-dry. See how to drop in and lift out color, use masking fluid or salt to create unique effects, and explore a dry-brush technique to create hard and soft edges. x
    • 8
      Methods: Color Mixing
      Understand your colors so you can better predict and mix the shades you want! In this lesson, Kateri shows you how to create essential mixing tools: a color wheel, color chart and value scale. x
    • 9
      Methods: Color Harmony
      Make the most of only six tubes of paint! Learn how pigments interact with one another to mix more luminous, harmonious colors. Then practice working with a limited palette to create triads and achieve clean results every time. x
    • 10
      Projects: Basic Landscape
      Watch as Kateri demonstrates painting a basic landscape step by step, including planning and selecting colors, breaking down the subject, foreground, middle ground and background, and adding final details. x
    • 11
      Projects: Basic Seascape
      Build on your skills by painting seascapes! See how to create new textures and shapes, such as rippling water, and apply masking fluid. Then practice lifting techniques to create waves, depth, drama and other final details. x
    • 12
      Projects: Expressive Mixed Media
      Explore a more expressive, gestural watercolor style. Start by dropping color into a water glaze on paper and see if any shapes or subjects emerge. Then lift, push and pull the pigment to refine the shape, using colored pencils and pens to define your subject. x
    • 13
      Projects: Botanical-Style Flower
      Put your wet-on-dry skills to work with a botanical-style painting! After planning and palette selection, move on to targeted water-glazing and color-dropping. Add depth and contour, then finish up with dry-brushing and final details. x
    • 14
      Projects: Detailed Bird
      Finally, create your most detailed work yet: a bird portrait. Begin with the eye, applying initial washes, then build the form, contrast and various textures. Finish up by adding a glazing wash and final details. x
  • Startup Library: Hand Embroidery

    Kat McTee, Embroidery Expert

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Love working with your hands? Give embroidery a try! In this comprehensive beginner’s class, expert Kat McTee walks you through the basics from choosing fabrics and floss to hooping up and crafting 19 beautiful stitches. Learn to create a gorgeous sampler as you master a range of key techniques, including how to work with letters, numbers and finished garments, finish flat embroidery and more.

    View Lecture List (13)
    13 Lectures  |  Startup Library: Hand Embroidery
    Lecture Titles (13)
    • 1
      What You Need: Fabrics, Floss, Needles & Hoops
      Discover why hand embroidery is a terrific budget-friendly craft for all ages as Kat helps you assemble the best beginner-friendly supplies, including fabric, floss, needles and hoops. x
    • 2
      Method: Transferring Designs
      Learn two easy ways to quickly transfer an embroidery design to fabric, then explore some additional methods to add to your embroidery toolkit. x
    • 3
      Method: Hoop Up & Get Started Stitching
      Find out how to separate stranded floss, thread your needle, and hoop up your fabric. You'll start stitching with the running stitch, the most basic, yet versatile stitch in embroidery. x
    • 4
      Learn & Practice: Straight & Outline Stitches
      Here, Kat introduces stitch families. Find out how to use them in the class sampler as she demonstrates five easy stitches that allow you to outline any shape and make lines or expressive marks on your embroidery. x
    • 5
      Learn & Practice: Spot Stitches & French Knots
      Find out how to add all-over texture and color to your sampler, plus all of your embroidery with simple spot stitches! Then Kat demystifies the French knot, a popular stitch that'll be your new favorite with just a little practice. x
    • 6
      Learn & Practice: Looped Stitches
      Curvy looped stitches are so much fun to make! See how to add five of them to your sampler, one by one. x
    • 7
      Learn & Practice: Fill Stitches
      Complete your sampler by coloring in the shapes with fill stitches, including the seed, satin, long and short stitches. Learn how to use other stitches as fill stitches to expand your possibilities! x
    • 8
      Method: Working With Designs
      Continue your embroidery journey by exploring a world of commercial embroidery designs. Or draw your own with Kat's handy tips for creating designs and choosing stitches. x
    • 9
      Method: Letters & Numbers
      Have something to say to the world? Stitch it! In this lesson, learn how to work with letters and numbers, including handwritten script, in your embroidery. Kat teaches you the couching technique to add to your stitch repertoire. x
    • 10
      Method: Finishing Options
      Wondering how to finish and display your sampler and other beautiful embroidery? Kat shows you how to transform them into pillows, sachets or patches. Or hang them on the wall in a plain or embellished hoop, or mounted on a stretched artist's canvas. x
    • 11
      Method: Floss Management
      By now, you may be collecting embroidery floss in all colors. Kat helps you manage all those little skeins and labels by offering suggestions for bobbins and convenient cases, then shares a handy technique for color blending. x
    • 12
      Apply It: Embroidering Denim
      Flash back to the 1970s and learn to embroider jeans, jean jackets and more! Get tips for working with denim and heavier fabrics, with or without a hoop, for tricky areas such as pockets, collars and more. x
    • 13
      Apply It: Embroidering Knits & More Embroidery Styles to Try
      Now you're ready to stitch on T-shirts, baby clothes and other stretchy knit fabrics! Find out how to use stabilizers for professional-looking results every time. x
  • Startup Library: Cake Decorating

    Jenny McCoy, Cake Decorating Expert

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Ready to sweeten up your skills? Explore the sugar art of cake decorating with Jenny McCoy as your expert guide. In this comprehensive beginner’s class, you’ll learn how to bake and construct a variety of one-tiered frosted cakes with professional-quality results. Along the way, discover essential tools, materials and techniques, including fondant and buttercream, sugar flowers, piping, hand modeling and much more.

    View Lecture List (13)
    13 Lectures  |  Startup Library: Cake Decorating
    Lecture Titles (13)
    • 1
      Introduction to Cake Decorating
      Ground yourself in the fundamentals of cake decorating as Jenny discusses the elements that make up a decorated cake. Discover a few basic tools, plus the timeline for making your first cake! x
    • 2
      How to Bake a Cake
      Get right into action by learning to make a yellow butter-based cake. Find out how to prepare the pans, mix the batter, and bake it to a beautiful golden brown. You can use the same recipe to make a chocolate version, too! x
    • 3
      Making Swiss Meringue Buttercream
      Jenny shows you how to make her favorite decorating frosting: Swiss meringue buttercream. It's a step up from the traditional one-bowl, powdered sugar-and-butter variation. x
    • 4
      Constructing a Single-Tier Cake
      Trim your baked cakes so they're uniform and level every time. Find out how to stack up the layers, fill them with frosting, and frost the entire cake with a crumb coat. You'll add a final coat for a sharp-edged flat finish that will get you ready to start decorating. x
    • 5
      Buttercream: Textured Finishes
      Discover three techniques for texturing cakes with buttercream: horizontal ridge, vertical stripe and a simple-yet-beautiful brushed finish. These finishes are not only beautiful and on trend, they're also great at covering up anything that's less than perfect. x
    • 6
      Buttercream: Preparing to Pipe
      Set yourself up for piping success by learning to color buttercream for endless customization. Jenny shows you how to fill a piping bag with buttercream and pipe a line of frosting. x
    • 7
      Buttercream: Simple Designs & Borders
      Once your buttercream is colored and in a pastry bag, practice making a few simple designs with two different tips: round and star. You'll see how to turn your designs into borders. x
    • 8
      Buttercream: Piped Roses & Leaves
      Continue to work on your piping skills by learning to pipe the classic buttercream rose with Jenny's step-by-step instructions. Don't worry if you mess up; since these beauties are away from your cake they can go right back in the frosting bowl. x
    • 9
      Fondant: Handling & Coloring
      Conquer the pliable sugar dough known as fondant as Jenny shares her best tips for handling, storing and coloring to make gorgeous, professional-looking decorated cakes. x
    • 10
      Fondant: Rolling Out & Covering a Cake
      It's important to give yourself a pristine, clean canvas for decorating. In this lesson, learn how to roll out fondant and drape it beautifully over your cakes. Jenny will also walk you through some common problems and explain how to fix them. x
    • 11
      Fondant: Cutouts
      See how to make a variety of fondant decorations from just a few simple cutters and place them securely as you make a cute and easy "Happy Birthday" cake. Plus, learn Jenny's secret no-stress method for writing messages on cakes. x
    • 12
      Fondant: 3-D Roses
      Here, Jenny introduces sugar flowers, then goes over a few basic techniques for hand-modeling petals to create a classic fondant rose. x
    • 13
      What's Next: Design Ideas & Inspiration
      In this final lesson, find out how to mix and match the above techniques to create new designs and cakes for any theme or occasion! x
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