Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History of the 17th and 18th Centuries

Course No. 447
Professor Alan Charles Kors, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
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Course No. 447
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Course Overview

Modern science, representative democracy, and a wave of wars were caused by a revolution of the intellect that seized Europe between 1600 and 1800. Shaking the minds of the continent like few things before or since, this revolution challenged previous ways of understanding reality and sparked what Professor Alan Charles Kors calls "perhaps the most profound transformation of European, if not human, life."

Revolutions in thought (as opposed to those in politics or science) are in many ways the most far-reaching. They affect our entire sense of legitimate authority, of the possible and impossible, of right and wrong, and of the potentials of human life.

The goal of these lectures is to understand the conceptual and cultural revolution of the Enlightenment. In them, you see the birth of modern thought in the dilemmas, debates, and extraordinary works of the 17th- and 18th-century mind.

Professor Kors is Henry Charles Lea Professor of European History at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught for over 30 years. His courses on European intellectual history have won two awards for distinguished teaching.

He is the editor-in-chief of the multi-volume Oxford University Press Encyclopedia of the Enlightenment and has written and edited several books on European intellectual history.

The Power of Aristotle and the Churchmen

When the 17th century dawned in Europe, past authors who had stood the test of time dominated the world of learning and understanding.

Their system of thought—Aristotelian scholasticism—emerged from the fusion of those authorities and Christian doctrine. Professor Kors shows how fully these ideas had suffused and controlled thought and society.

The Walls begin to Crumble

A series of fundamental assaults upon the inherited intellectual system dominated the intellectual life of the 17th century.

Those assaults constituted nothing less than a conceptual revolution that altered the European relationship to thought, nature, and human possibility. With Professor Kors, you examine the key thinkers who changed the world.

  • Francis Bacon, politician and philosopher, criticized the entire Western intellectual inheritance, revising the human quest for knowledge and transforming the uses of knowledge into power over the forces of nature.
  • René Descartes created a coherent philosophical system that became the major challenge to scholasticism on the Continent. Descartes sought to demonstrate that humans can establish a criterion of truth and, with it, know with certainty the real nature of things.
  • Thomas Hobbes, author of the monumental work of political philosophy known as Leviathan (1651), argued that the entire world was matter in motion according to mechanical laws. Thus, there was no freedom of the will, and all things were the necessary results of prior causes.
  • Blaise Pascal was one of the 17th century's most influential fideists. Philosophical skepticism is the belief that we may know nothing with certainty. When used to humble human reason and demonstrate our dependence on religious faith, it is termed "fideism"—yet another systematic assault on Aristotelian scholasticism.
Physics, Politics, and the End of the Old Order

The new knowledge had gained a foothold, but then you see how Newton made it dominant. The 1687 publication of Newton's Principia Mathematica was not merely a major event in the history of Western science but a watershed in the history of Western culture.

Newton's Principia convinced the majority of its readers that the world was ordered and coherent and that the human mind, using Baconian inductive methodology and mathematical reasoning, could grasp that order.

John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) changed the way in which the culture thought about the whole phenomenon of human knowledge.

To Locke, the mind begins as a blank slate on which experience imprints ideas via the senses and via reflection. Because experience is not logically determined, our knowledge of the world is merely probable. The Baron de Montesquieu expanded Locke's idea in the areas of law, society, and politics.

The Dam Bursts

The 18th century sought to take the models of Newton and Locke and apply them to the fullest possible range of human inquiry and endeavor.

The heirs of that conceptual revolution—the "new philosophers"—both popularized what they took to be the substance and implications of what had occurred in the 17th century and extended them to new areas of inquiry. You study the work of David Hume, Voltaire, the "philosophes," and the encyclopedist Denis Diderot.

  • They dealt with the dramatic implications of the new philosophy for religious issues: miracle, revelation, supernaturalism, the authority of the priesthood, human nature, sin, and virtue.
  • They sought to understand both society and religion in increasingly natural terms, to establish the rights of freedom of inquiry and belief, and to discredit, reform, or replace those authorities that could not justify themselves by the new criteria and proper uses of knowledge.

By the end of the 18th century, the prestige of ancient thought and of the inherited system was a thing of the past.

The new ideas were not accepted without dissent. Rousseau, writing in the middle of the 18th century, framed a profoundly influential critique, which echoes down to our own day. He argued that cultural "progress" inevitably leads to moral decadence via the proliferation of artificial needs and inequalities. But his protest did not stop the march of progress.

Educated Europeans believed that they had a new understanding—of thought and the human mind, of method, of nature, and of the uses of knowledge—with which they could come to know the world correctly for the first time in human history and with which they could rewrite the possibilities of human life.

Soon, under the weight of these new ideas, all over the globe, monarchs fell.

This course puts us at the heart of the most far-reaching and consequential intellectual changes in the history of European civilization.

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24 lectures
 |  Average 31 minutes each
  • 1
    Introduction—Intellectual History and Conceptual Change
    Revolutions in thought—as opposed to those, for example, in politics or science—are in many ways the most influential and far-reaching, because they affect our entire sense of legitimate authority, of the possible and impossible, of right and wrong, and of the potentials of human life. x
  • 2
    The Dawn of the 17th Century—Aristotelian Scholasticism
    The intellectual inheritance of the educated world in the 17th century was a fusion of Aristotelian, and other Greek, philosophy and of Christian theology. It was—and is—known as "scholasticism," or, more precisely, as Aristotelian scholasticism. This system dominated the universities and schools of Europe at the time. x
  • 3
    The New Vision of Francis Bacon
    Francis Bacon, politician and philosopher, undertook the sizeable tasks of criticizing the Western intellectual inheritance, revising the human quest for knowledge, and transforming the uses of knowledge into power over the forces of nature—upon which humans' suffering, or well-being, was thought to depend. x
  • 4
    The New Astronomy and Cosmology
    Astronomy was an eminent science in the 17th century, and much of the challenge to scholasticism began in that field of inquiry. Among the challenges to Aristotelianism was neo-Pythagorean thought, which viewed the universe in terms of mathematics and geometry, not in terms of Aristotelian "qualities," and which saw the Sun as an emblem of God's divinity. x
  • 5
    Descartes's Dream of Perfect Knowledge
    In the first half of the 17th century, Descartes created a coherent philosophical system that became, on the Continent, the major challenge to scholasticism. Descartes sought to demonstrate that humans can establish a criterion of truth and, with it, know with certainty the real nature and the real causes of things. x
  • 6
    The Specter of Thomas Hobbes
    Hobbes, author of the monumental work of political philosophy known as Leviathan (1651), argued that the world, including the entire realm of human experience, was matter in motion according to fixed, mechanical laws; there was no freedom of the will, and all things were the necessary results of prior causes. x
  • 7
    Skepticism and Jansenism—Blaise Pascal
    Philosophical skepticism is the belief that we may know nothing with certainty. When used to humble human reason and demonstrate our dependence on religious faith it is termed "fideism"—yet another systematic assault on Aristotelian scholasticism. Blaise Pascal was one of the 17th century's two most influential fideists. x
  • 8
    Newton's Discovery
    A significant number of critics of Aristotelianism were in communication with each other by the middle of the 17th century. In England, such a group evolved into the Royal Society, which first published the monumental scientific work of Sir Isaac Newton. x
  • 9
    The Newtonian Revolution
    The 1687, publication of Newton's Principia Mathematica was not merely a major event in the history of Western science, but a watershed in the history of Western culture. Newton's Principia convinced the majority of its readers that the world was ordered and coherent, and that the human mind, using Baconian inductive methodology and mathematical reasoning, could grasp that order. x
  • 10
    John Locke—The Revolution in Knowledge
    John Locke's influence upon the late 17th and early 18th centuries cannot be overestimated; his Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) changed the way in which the culture thought about the whole phenomenon of human knowledge. x
  • 11
    The Lockean Moment
    In Locke's empiricist view, the mind begins as a blank slate on which experience imprints ideas via the senses and via reflection. We cannot know, nor should we speculate about, what is beyond our experience. Because experience is not logically determined, our knowledge of the world is merely probable. x
  • 12
    Skepticism and Calvinism—Pierre Bayle
    Although obscure to most contemporary readers, the French Protestant fideist Pierre Bayle was one of the most influential authors of his time. His Historical and Critical Dictionary (1697) is intended to expose the arrogance of reason and show that anything but a simple, peaceful faith leads to superstition, intolerance, and cruelty. x
  • 13
    The Moderns—The Generation of 1680-1715
    This generation of readers and authors increasingly rejects the presumptive authority of the past, increasingly believes induction from data (not deduction from inherited premises) to be the path to truth, and makes a systematic inquiry into experience—now seen as "the book of nature," the heart of natural philosophy, which holds that there are no supernatural beings or causes in the world. x
  • 14
    Introduction to Deism
    Deism, a widespread religious phenomenon among the educated classes of Europe in the 18th century, embodies belief in a God whose existence and goodness are proven by nature, and disbelief in the Judeo-Christian (or any other) tradition and revelation. x
  • 15
    The Conflict Between Deism and Christianity
    Deism represents the first fundamental challenge to Judeo-Christian theology to emerge strongly within Christian culture itself. Deist and Christian thinkers clash over the most essential theological issues: the source of our knowledge of God, the grounds of religious belief, sin, and more. x
  • 16
    Montesquieu and the Problem of Relativism
    If, as the Lockeans believed, knowledge and moral ideas are determined by one's experience, then one's sense of the world must necessarily be relative to one's time, place, personal experience, and physical senses. The Baron de Montesquieu explores this idea, particularly as it touches on questions of law, society, and politics. x
  • 17
    Voltaire—Bringing England To France
    Few works had greater impact in popularizing the intellectual revolution of the 17th century, and in inaugurating the debates that would shape the 18th century in France, than Voltaire's Lettres Philosophiques (1734), in which the author celebrates English religious, political, commercial, and intellectual liberty. x
  • 18
    Bishop Joseph Butler and God's Providence
    Bishop Butler, the preeminent moral theologian of the Church of England, argued that human beings are made for happiness and virtue, and that our nature conduces to both simultaneously. Among those influenced by this revered and pious churchman's views was Thomas Jefferson. x
  • 19
    The Skeptical Challenge to Optimism—David Hume
    In his posthumously published Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779), the philosopher and skeptic Hume challenged the fundamental premise of natural religion: That we must infer logically from the data of nature a wise, intelligent, good, omnipotent, and providential God. x
  • 20
    The Assault upon Philosophical Optimism—Voltaire
    Candide is Voltaire's most famous and enduring work. On the surface it is a lively satirical novella. It has dark and serious undertones, however, for it marks the author's agonized rejection of the optimistic notion that God would only have created "the best of all possible worlds" and, thus, that all things in the world serve an ultimate good. x
  • 21
    The Philosophes—The Triumph of the French Enlightenment
    In 18th-century France, there emerged a diverse community of thinkers and writers who thought of themselves as new philosophers and whose mission was a critical re-examination of knowledge, authority, and institutions. These were the philosophes of the French Enlightenment. x
  • 22
    Beccaria and Enlightened Reform
    The view that both individuals and societies should seek happiness led the 18th century to place great weight on the role of the legislator. This, in turn, spawned a great interest in the law and one of the most influential works of the time, Cesare Beccaria's On Crimes and Punishments (1763)—an effort to reform, rationalize, and soften the criminal laws of Europe. x
  • 23
    Rousseau's Dissent
    Rousseau, writing in the middle of the 18th century, dissented from prevailing Enlightenment beliefs. He framed a profoundly influential critique, which echoes down to our own day, by arguing that cultural "progress" inevitably leads to moral decadence via the proliferation of artificial needs and inequalities. x
  • 24
    Materialism & Naturalism—The Boundaries of the Enlightenment
    The natural, and at times atheistic, world of the philosophe and encyclopédiste Denis Diderot marks the ultimate rejection of the purposeful, qualitative world of Aristotelian scholasticism and begins the debates of the modern age in all of their intensity. x

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Your professor

Alan Charles Kors

About Your Professor

Alan Charles Kors, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Alan Charles Kors is Henry Charles Lea Professor of European History at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has been teaching since 1968. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and his master's and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. He received postdoctoral fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, and the...
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Reviews

Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History of the 17th and 18th Centuries is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 129.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from informative I've listened to the first 6 lectures on CD; many of the philosopers names were known to me but I had limited knowledge of their ideas, this course certainly corrected that; Professor Kors mentioned a couple of times that he wanted to avoid any bias favoring some philosophical ideas over others and to present the material accurately and clearly for the listener to make those judgemnts for themselves; I think the professor has done that (again, I've onlistened to the first 6 lectures), Professor Kors speaks in a slow and articulate manner with a regional dialect that I do not find troublesome; one thing I didn't care for was the guide book did not follow the professor's presentation very well, the lecture being given more chronologically then the guide guidebook, which jumped around a bit; this problem would not prevent me from recommending this course and Professor Kors's teaching style.
Date published: 2018-12-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nice Survey I actually haven't finished this series, but I'm engaged with it. I think at times it wanders a little, but it does offer insights into these centuries that I hadn't considered, like Deism I little knowledge on. The lecturer does have a New Jersey accent, which he warns you about, that can be a little hard on the ears, but I it's easy to get used to it.
Date published: 2018-09-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Question Time This seems to be an older course but it is as true today as ever. We need to question what we think, how we think and the best way is to review the ways of thinking from the 17th and 18th century changes. This Course is presented brilliantly. Professor Kors is able to demonstrate the intellectual development with clear language. This and his Course specifically on Voltaire is an education in personal Enlightenment. I found the lectures and the written guide to be stimulating and well worth serious study for an examined life! If you are new to The Great Courses, this one is fundamental.
Date published: 2018-08-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I AM A FORMER PROFESSOR OF MODERN EROPEAN HISTORY IN THE CALFORNIA STATE UIVERSITY SYSTEM, AND I FOUND THIS SERIES OF LECTURES TO BE ABSOLUTELY FIRST RATE!
Date published: 2018-07-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great subject and great lecturer. This is an important piece of intellectual history. I’ve listened to it several times.
Date published: 2018-06-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent as usual Interesting, informative, useful. It held my attention.
Date published: 2018-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very engaging professor I am about a third of the way through the course, and it is exceeding my expectations. Prof. Kors presents the material in a way that conveys his own passion for the topic. These towering figures from intellectual history come alive and fit together into a logical and engaging story.
Date published: 2018-04-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enthralling I thoroughly enjoyed every single lecture in this course. They were interesting, entertaining, enlightening and well delivered. The course managed to convey a huge amount of information in a clear and concise way whilst also managing to reflect the lecturer's passion and interest in the subject matter. I would thoroughly recommend this course to anyone who wants to gain a better understanding of the ideas, figures and complexity of the Enlightenment and its influence today. (I purchased this on sale so found it excellent value for money. As a student I am not sure I'd be able to afford the course at full price.)
Date published: 2018-02-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Well Organized Professionally presented, well organized material.
Date published: 2018-02-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A very enlightening course If you would like to understand the conceptual and cultural revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries as a historical phenomenon, this course is for you. Professor Alan Kos describes the broad themes of these centuries very clearly and engagingly through the dilemmas and debates and amazing works of the 17th and 18th century mind. His oratorical style is pleasant to listen to as well as the very tight and masterful presentation of this material. The compression and clarity is very impressive. This is one of the most enjoyable courses I have ever taken through the Great Courses.
Date published: 2018-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent in several ways Kors is my favorite GC prof for intellectual history. Yes he has an accent but no it really does not detract from his exceptionally clear, fluid and cogent lectures. He is not reading a script and it feels like he is looking at you over a lecturn (feels because I did audio). I audited a University of Wisconsin course - the Englightenment & its critics - just before listening to this one. As a result, I had read the material Kors covers plus a lot more. Some of the UW assigned readings were from Kors work. If you have an interest in this area, you should buy it immediately. This is a survey course about intellectuals but he integrates their works and influences into coherent story of how we have come to “think” about the world around us.
Date published: 2017-12-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Thought Provoking One thing that always impresses me about The Great Courses is how non-judgmental the instructors are. They are fair to the various individuals and schools of thought they discuss. They also make complex ideas accessible to interested non-professionals. I'm learning a great deal from this and the other courses I have bought, but I'm also glad I don't have to take a midterm or final exam on them. Just as with the other courses I've ordered, I can learn without pressure. That has encouraged me to take this course and others that are outside my usual comfort zone.
Date published: 2017-12-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Couldn't Get By The Voice This review is based on the audio-only presentation. And, unfortunately, through no fault of his own, Professor Kors has a voice that sounds like Jack Nicholson, or, rather, someone doing a bad parody of Jack Nicholson. At the outset Professor Kors mentions his accent - New Jersey north - so he is aware of it. Even when I repeated a lecture, the voice - and his tendency to repeat or speak very slooooowly - kept me from getting much out of the course. Too bad, because it is a topic that I had a lot of interest in.
Date published: 2017-11-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heat lectures! Extremely well organized and logic explanation of difficult concepts!
Date published: 2017-10-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great survey course of this era's great thinkers The best teachers are the ones who can speak on their discipline with clarity. There is no-one better at demonstrating clarity than Professor Alan Kors. He has a knack for making a complex topic easily understandable. He organized the philosophies of the 17th and 18th centuries in such a way that brought the birth of the modern mind mind into clear focus. I found him to be one of the best teachers I've ever had. I wish my undergrad philosophy professors had presented their material in such an understandable manner.
Date published: 2017-09-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Very confused Prof. Kors description of Aristotelian Scholasticism, in his second lecture, is deeply confused, combining elements of neo-Platonism, gnosticism, and nonsense. His discussion of the Scholastic teaching on the souls of human beings, angels, and devils is just plain wrong. At one point, he says the Scholastics say plants aren't capable of reproduction, which I would have dismissed as an accident if there weren't so many other errors in his account. I do appreciate his description of medieval attitudes toward authority and his recognition that modern people are as likely credulously to follow authorities as people at any time in the past. I suggest that listeners question Prof. Kors' authority and the reliability of his account.
Date published: 2017-09-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great way to learn how thinking has evolved This course is intellectually demanding but clarifying of Western philosophy and its progressions during the 16th through 17th centuries.
Date published: 2017-09-12
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History Fascinating perspective from an expert in his field. After each lecture, I look forward to that which follows.
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Making intellectual history exciting The lecturer has organized the topics in an effective way. Each topic/lecture has a central theme or two. One of the lecturer's operative words is "drama," and his dramatization of what was at stake at a given intellectual moment I find highly effective. I have listened through the course three times now and my appreciation for these qualities has grown with each hearing. The lecturer's infrequent sudden humorous asides are also fun. The lectures are now nearly twenty years old but the subject is a classic one so the content has aged well.
Date published: 2017-04-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Now I get it! This is one of the top three or four courses I have ever taken (and I've bought scores through Teaching Company). Prof. Kors is a superb teacher and explains philosophical ideas and developments so we can understand. (P.S. Don't let his accent put you off; I admit I almost did. He is a top-rate lecturer.)
Date published: 2017-03-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Comprehensive Journey I bought this DVD so I could review the lectures after they were presented in a class. The information is very complex with an emphasis on unfamiliar terms. Even so, the content is worth the extra effort to absorb it.
Date published: 2017-03-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent overview of the birth of the modern mind Superb presentation of a complex subject by a wonderful teacher. The birth of the modern mind and the creation of the Enlightenment are subjects which should appeal to anyone interested in the development of our democracy, rule of law and way of perceiving the world. Professor Kors is a marvel of erudition, clarity of thought and engaging presentation. Teaching at its best.
Date published: 2017-03-16
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Good content; tedious presentation style I have listened to many courses from The Great Courses, and this is the first one I have disliked. The professor seemed disorganized and unfocused, and his speaking style was monotonous and difficult to follow. I listened to each lecture, but I was relieved to finally get to the end.
Date published: 2017-02-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from These Seemed Like Important Centuries This is a fine offering by A.C. Kors. It has a bit of an Anglo-French tilt to it, but not everyone can be expected to be an expert in everything at all times in all places for all time. At least I don't expect it. Maybe you're different and have higher expectations. That's possible. Anyhow, if you want a foundation of Enlightenment thought built around the major thinkers, this course will do well. If you felt like it, you could make yourself a grilled cheese sandwich and listen to Leo Damrosch's course on the Enlightenment and the Modern Self. A.C. Kors has a somewhat unusual voice, but I had no problem with it. He also reminds the audience that he is not trying to endorse or defend a particular position (e.g. materialism, atheism); rather, he's simply describing it in its historical and intellectual context. It's almost as if he's saying, "Look, wash your own brain, but your not going to catch me doing any brainwashing. Maybe think for yourself for once in your life." After listening to this course, I'll probably listen to A.C. Kors's episodes on Voltaire. I listened to them once, but I didn't give them my full attention, so I think I'll return to them.
Date published: 2016-12-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from too slow, terrible presentation Way too slow, each 30 minutes could be covered in less than 10 minutes. His presentation is weird , never just talks, but almost every sentence is like with an exclamation point. Very annoying. Topics covered are spotty, barely mentions the printing pres! Choice of past people is strange & biased some how - not clear what his are. Annoying always says the "17th century" instead of "in the 16 hundreds. copyright date is 1998 ! This should have been junked long ago, this one is going back.
Date published: 2016-11-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Extraordinary learning experience Audio download. For those considering purchasing this lecture series (of course when it's on sale and you have a coupon), please, please do it...you'll be the wiser for it. Despite, or maybe because of, Dr Kors deliberate delivery style these lectures provide a clear pictures of the extraordinary evolution of human thought that happened in the 16th to 18th centuries that resonate with us today, especially we in the US. Kors adroitly traces the history thinking process from Aristotelian scholasticism and rationalism to empiricism and naturalism (and the scientific method). These are all big words that, before listening (and re-listening...again and again) I had little sense or context. 'Calvin and Hobbes' was just about a young boy's imagination. Newton was responsible for my 'C' in Calculus 101. Voltaire was into satire...you get the idea. Dr Kors methodically takes us through this philosophical evolution, largely stimulated by huge leaps in the understanding of how the universe works. Scientific discoveries by Descartes, Pascal and, of course, Newton changed the way humans looked at the deeply entrenched dogmas so prevalent at the time, by advancing man's knowledge of the universe. Works by Bacon, Bayle and Butler were countered or augmented by Montesquieu, Locke, Hobbes and Voltaire (you'll have to look elsewhere for Spinoza). Naturalism became more widely accepted...Deism allowed humans to consider careful observation of nature over supernatural causes. The Enlightenment's legacy involves our desire to learn from experience and to apply that learning to all aspects of living. In the concluding lectures, Finally, Kors reflects on Diderot's writings which state (in part): "Time and purely natural agencies transform the living into inorganic and the inorganic into the living. Life and death are two modes of the same matter. The hypothesis of God explains nothing, confuses much, and is unnecessary." My summary is oh so inadequate. These lectures are powerful and should pondered often as they summarize so clearly the foundations of our society today. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2016-11-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good, but too much for a beginner to follow. I like to watch it, but if you are new to the subject area it is difficult to remember what was covered before when he talks about various individuals in the same 30 minutes. 30 minutes is a short time to try to cover such deep subjects. He does a very good job. I guess I just have a hard time keeping them all straight as the lessons go forward.
Date published: 2016-10-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History Very thought provoking. Appropriate depth of presentation and nexus among topics. I am enjoying it very much and suspect I will re-listen to it many, many times.
Date published: 2016-10-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from extraordinary one of the very best courses from TGC, a wonderful amble through the philosophical currents that shaped Western culture in the 17th and 18th Centuries - Professor Kors delivers his lectures at a walking pace, he is passionate, eloquent, and eminently, and evidently, well prepared, the classes are effortless and, simultaneously, utterly fascinating - I couldn't recommend these lectures too highly, they are each and every one of them a revelation
Date published: 2016-09-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Birth of the Modern Very interesting material. The course is a classic. How did we begin thinking as we do. (Modern). It is a survey of the highly renowned European philosophers of the 17 and 18centuries. Names I have heard throughout, but with little knowledge of why they are important. Kors (lecturer, As a NYer even for me his NY (he says NJ) accent takes some getting used to) does a very great job of hitting the high points. Most importantly to me, he has sufficiently provoked my interest so that I want to read more about several of these modernists. Bacon, Descartes, Newton, Locke. It seems to me that To some extent their differences are equivalent to "dancing on the head of a needle." But Newton explained the universe for the first time. And that has made all the difference in the transition from the dark to the light.
Date published: 2016-08-23
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