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Cultural Events

Cultural Events in:

Upcoming Cultural Events

  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours — Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA
    War is a persistent attribute of human cultures through time, and weapons are crafted with a practical, and deadly, intent. Nearly as pervasive as war itself, is the practice of decorating objects used to wage it. Arts of War: Artistry in Weapons across Cultures is a new Peabody Museum exhibition that presents the varied beauty and craftsmanship of war objects drawn from cultures around the world. From maces, clubs, daggers, and spears, to shields, helmets, and entire suits of armor, this exhibition offers museum-goers more than 150 striking examples of weapons that are also extraordinary works of art. What would compel a warrior to deliberately imbue his weapon with beauty that stands in such stark contrast to its intended purpose? And why are war objects so much more common and elaborately decorated than those crafted for peace-making? Arts of War: Artistry in Weapons across Cultures probes intriguing questions, unveils the stories behind some of the most stunning war objects ever created, and explores the passion and purpose of the people who made them.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Times Vary - Premier Exhibition Center, Atlantic Station, 265 18th St., Atlanta
    Bodies: The Exhibition provides an intimate and informative view into the human body. More than 200 actual human bodies and specimens, meticulously dissected and respectfully displayed, offer an unprecedented and wholly unique look into your amazing body. Come explore, experience and celebrate the wonder of the human form. Ticket price: $14-$24. See the website for additional information and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - The San Diego Museum of Man, Balboa Park, 1350 El Prado, San Diego
    In this thoughtful one-of-a-kind exhibit, you'll discover that cannibals aren't who you think they are. In fact, there's a good chance that your ancestors were cannibals. You may even have a few cannibalistic practices yourself. Ticket price: $7.50-$20 (includes general admission to the museum). See the website for additional information and to purchase tickets.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, 571 S. Kilgo Cir., Atlanta
    Baskets were one of the first art forms in the Americas, with basket fragments found in California and the Southwest dating to 9,400 years ago. Over the millennia, native North Americans developed elaborate techniques and intricate designs worked in local materials, from sweetgrass in Florida to black ash in the Northeast and deer grass in California, among many others. These materials were sacred to their makers and those who used these special containers. So too was the way each was made with coiling, especially poignant, symbolizing for many groups the path of human emergence from inside earth and the movement of the spirits between realms. This exhibition explores the intersection between material, making, and meaning in the fragile basketry art of the Southeast to the Southwest and up into the Arctic. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Center Hours - National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St., independence Mall, Philadelphia
    The National Constitution Center is proud to display one of the 12 surviving copies of the Bill of Rights. The Museum of We the People is the first institution in Pennsylvania to exhibit this historic document to the general public. it has been preserved as part of The New York Public Library's renowned research collection for over 100 years. The Bill of Rights is displayed alongside a first edition Stone Engraving of the Declaration of independence and a rare copy of the first public printing of the U.S. Constitution in the brand new George H.W. Bush Gallery. Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of admission to the center.
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  • Exhibit
    Through December 31, Museum Hours - San Diego Museum of Art, Balboa Park, 1450 El Prado, San Diego
    In 2011, the Museum received an extraordinary gift from the Estate of Vance E. Kondon and Liesbeth Giesberger: 48 exceptional works by the leaders of the German and Austrian avant-garde in the first part of the 20th century, including Otto Dix, George Grosz, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele. Presented as a temporary exhibition in 2012, The San Diego Museum of Art's remarkable collection of German Expressionist paintings, drawings and prints is displayed in a specially dedicated Gallery 19 off the Upper Rotunda. Breaking with Academic tradition, progressive artists in Germany and Austria at the beginning of the 20th century looked to Paris for new ideas. Concerned with this new state of affairs, artists of the Brucke (Bridge) group sought to establish a genuinely German avant-garde. First in Dresden, then in Berlin, they pitted a revolutionary art and rebellious lifestyle against the accepted order. They longed, also, to escape the oppressive constraints of modern life. Like their Romantic predecessors, the artists of the Brucke regarded communion with nature as a source of spiritual renewal. While a commissioned work, such as Lovis Corinth's Portrait of Alexander Freiherr von Reitzenstein, could remain rooted in Post-Impressionism, members of the Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider) group, such as Alexej Jawlensky and Gabriele Munter, explored their predilection for bold, expressive colors. The collector, Vance E. Kondon, reflected on his own selections: Often, I'm asked why I started collecting. If you know the history of the early Brucke artists, you realize that they were poor, free spirits. They lived communally, and shared the same space, materials, ideas and hopes. They were openly sensual, and nudity was-at times-a way of life. They sought more freedom of emotional expression and less ritual and restraint. And they brought this approach to their art, using vibrant color, looseness of form, and themes from everyday life." Entry to the exhibit is included in the price of museum admission."
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  • Lecture
    January 6, February 3, and March 3, 6:30 pm — Meeting Room, Kenton Branch–Multnomah County Library, 8226 N. Denver Ave., Portland
    Psychobiography is the analysis of historically significant lives through the use of psychological theory and research. Its aim is to understand persons, and to uncover the private motives behind public acts, whether those acts involve the making of art or the creation of scientific theories, or the adoption of political decisions. William Todd Schultz is a world renowned psychobiographer and personality scientist. He is the author of three books exploring connections between psychology and art: one on writer Truman Capote (Tiny Terror), one on photographer Diane Arbus (An Emergency in Slow Motion), and one on musician Elliott Smith (Torment Saint). He has also written articles or book chapters on Sylvia Plath, Kafka, Jack Kerouac, Oscar Wilde, Roald Dahl, James Agee, and others. He oversees the Oxford University Press book series Inner Lives, and his essays have appeared in Slate, Huffington Post, Salon, the Spectator, and other outlets. See the website for each evening's topic. This event is free to attend.
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  • Exhibit
    Ongoing Exhibit, Museum Hours - Getty Villa, 17985 Pacific Coast Hwy., Pacific Palisades, CA
    Roman decor was unique for the elaborate mosaic floors that transformed entire rooms into spectacular settings of vibrant color, figural imagery, and geometric design. Scenes from mythology, daily life, the natural world, and spectacles in the arena enlivened interior spaces and reflected the cultural ambitions of wealthy patrons. Drawn primarily from the Getty Museum's collection, this exhibition presents the artistry of mosaics as well as the contexts of their discovery across Rome's expanding empire-from its center in Italy to provinces in North Africa, southern Gaul, and ancient Syria. Admission to the exhibit is free of charge.
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