On Sale Through October 11. Announcing 3 New Releases on Sale Now: How to Play Piano, Understanding Russia: A Cultural History, How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide.
On Sale Through October 11. Announcing 3 New Releases on Sale Now: How to Play Piano, Understanding Russia: A Cultural History, How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide.
  • How to Play Piano
    Course  |  How to Play Piano

    Professor Pamela D. Pike, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    In 36 accessible lessons, How to Play Piano gives you the building blocks you need to go from an interested novice to expressive and talented player. Blending music theory and history with hands-on examples and step-by-step instruction, Professor Pamela Pike guides you through the basic foundations and advanced techniques of piano playing—and shows you how to practice between lessons to make the most of your study.

    View Lecture List (36)

    In 36 accessible lessons, How to Play Piano gives you the building blocks you need to go from an interested novice to expressive and talented player. Blending music theory and history with hands-on examples and step-by-step instruction, Professor Pamela Pike guides you through the basic foundations and advanced techniques of piano playing—and shows you how to practice between lessons to make the most of your study.

    View Lecture List (36)
    36 Lectures  |  How to Play Piano
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Basic Piano Rhythm and Fingering
      Let's start by playing some music! From minute one of this course, you will be at the piano, fingering keys and playing tunes. In this opening lesson, you'll familiarize yourself with the piano, perform a few basic exercises to warm up, and explore some introductory rhythm patterns. By the end of the lesson, you'll know how to play the theme from Beethoven's Ode to Joy. x
    • 2
      Pitch and Off-Staff Notation
      After reviewing the introductory finger patterns you learned in the first lesson, delve into the concepts of pitch and meter. Find out about the concept of measures and different types of notes. Then explore the C major five-finger pattern and play it in action with your first etude. x
    • 3
      Tonic and Dominant Harmony
      The piano is a brilliant instrument because it can be used for both melody and harmony, the lead tune and the accompaniment. In this introduction to harmony, you'll explore the tonic and dominant notes of a scale, and you'll revisit Ode to Joy to better understand these concepts in action. x
    • 4
      Intervals and Basic Notation
      “Tempo” refers to speed in music, and it can be measured with a metronome. Continue working on the interplay of harmony and melody. When you add time to the equation, you can explore “intervals,” or pitches in a scale. You’ve learned enough at this point to study basic notation—the first step toward musical mastery. x
    • 5
      Major Chords and Simple Accompaniment
      Begin to familiarize yourself with the landmark pitches on the staff. By practicing various five-finger patterns (including C major, D major, E major, and A major), you will soon be able to match a tune to a specific tempo. This lesson also introduces the concept of “chords,” a triad of notes that allow for richer accompaniment. x
    • 6
      Fourths, Accidentals, and Relaxation
      Round out your study of the major five-finger patterns, and how “accidentals” (changing a pitch by half a step) work. Jazz around with “When the Saints Go Marching In,” and then learn about the interval of the fourth. Add “Aura Lee”—the folk song Elvis used for “Love Me Tender”—to your repertoire. x
    • 7
      Primary Chords
      Delve more deeply into the concept of chords and see how they can offer a richer harmony than single notes or two-note harmonic intervals. Examine one of the most popular chord progressions: I-IV-V-I (tonic to subdominant to dominant to tonic), one of the most common patterns in Western music. x
    • 8
      Transposition at the Piano
      Transposition—moving a melody from one key to another—is an important skill often under-used in traditional piano lessons for beginners. It provides an opportunity to get to know the different musical keys and can help you jazz around with an old piece of repertoire. Practice transposition with a few melodies, including “Woodland Jaunt.” x
    • 9
      Chord Inversions
      This lesson will enrich your musical life by building the technical foundation upon which piano music is based. Inverted chords (moving the lowest note of a triad up an octave) is a complex musical detail that will open your ears for future lessons. Learn to recognize how inversions look on the staff and the correct fingerings to play them. x
    • 10
      Chord Progressions and Arpeggios
      Here, build on the last lesson about chord inversions and take a deeper look at the dominant chord. Try your hand at transposing a new chord progression into various keys, and then practice some C major cross-hand arpeggios. The move may be tricky at first, but Professor Pike gives you plenty of time to practice. x
    • 11
      Accompaniment Patterns and Sight-Reading
      Find out about a practice technique called “blocking,” which will help you recognize chord patterns more easily—a major step toward sight-reading. Practice three types of accompaniment patterns: the broken-chord pattern, the waltz (3/4 time) pattern, and the Alberti bass pattern. x
    • 12
      Harmonization and Damper Pedal
      In this lesson, you’ll discover the final five-finger pattern—G flat—rounding out your knowledge of key signatures. You’ll continue working to harmonize melodies with the accompaniment patterns you learned in Lesson 11, and you will begin a new technique—using the damper pedal. x
    • 13
      Minor Finger Patterns and Chords
      Now that you are growing comfortable with the major key signatures, shift your attention to the minor finger patterns and chords. You’ll learn several new pieces (“Skip to My Lou” and a minor étude), and you’ll continue practicing your efforts at sight-reading. You will also discover an important new skill: how to harmonize a lead line. x
    • 14
      Articulation: Legato and Staccato
      Playing the piano is as much art as science, so here you will consider several techniques to boost the artistry of your playing. The way you articulate or play notes (also known as staccato and legato) will add personality to your playing. Practice with two new pieces: Gurlitt's At School and Diabelli's Waltz. x
    • 15
      One-Octave Major Scales and Major Intervals
      So far, you’ve been practicing five-finger scales, but in Western music, a complete scale is an octave, or eight notes. Expand your abilities to play full eight-note scales, and practice with C major, G major and D major. In addition to working on your existing repertoire, you’ll add the jazzy “Minor Romp” and “A Turkish Tune” to the mix. x
    • 16
      Dotted Rhythms and Isolated Repetition
      Hone the new musical skills you learned in Lesson 15. After reviewing scales and learning to harmonize a minor melody, you’ll experiment with a new rhythm pattern. Dig into “A Turkish Tune” to isolate problem spots, and then try your hand at a theme from Beethoven’s Minuet in G. x
    • 17
      Secondary Chords and More Dotted Rhythms
      Learning to play the piano is a complex, challenging process, so don’t worry if you feel like you’re hitting a plateau. In addition to expanding your knowledge of theory—including secondary chords—use this lesson as a time to review what you know and assess what needs work. x
    • 18
      Sixteenth Notes and More Secondary Chords
      Secondary chords are those that must go to the primary chord for resolution. Deepen your understanding of secondary chords by improvising with the minor second chord, and then playing around with the third and sixth chords. Deepen your abilities with Beethoven’s Minuet in G and the Harp Étude. x
    • 19
      Compound Meter and Technique
      After reviewing your sight-reading skills to date, going over the Beethoven Minuet again, and revisiting the secondary chord progressions, Professor Pike shows you two new time signatures: 2/4 time and 3/8 time. She also shows you some new music: the peppy “Cheerful Tune” and the “Rocking Étude” to bring compound meter to life. x
    • 20
      Parallel Major and Minor Keys
      Reflect on the relationship between parallel major and minor keys. For example, D major and D minor are not relative keys (like C major and A minor), but they do have an intriguing relationship. In this exploration, you will refine your technique for harmonizing melodies and learn the “Bell Melody” and “Elephant Stroll.” x
    • 21
      Three Forms of the Minor Scale and Syncopation
      Over the past few lessons, you have moved from very basic off-staff rhythms and pitches to much more complicated rhythmic patterns. Today’s lesson takes your knowledge of the minor keys to a whole new level as you examine the natural, harmonic, and melodic forms of the minor scale. Also, witness “syncopation” in action in Swing Low. x
    • 22
      Artistic Expression and More Minor Keys
      Revisit the expressive quality of music and how you can use the techniques you are learning to better convey expression. Professor Pike offers a few tips for where amateurs tend to get distracted with anticipation. Reflect on how musical dynamics are related to the musical line, form, and harmonic progression. x
    • 23
      The Classical Period and Fortepianos
      Learning to play the piano is about more than acquiring, perfecting, and practicing techniques. Understanding the time periods of music history help inform your understanding of practice. Here, start with the Classical period and learn how the piano developed as an instrument. Play Mozart's theme from the Sonata in C. x
    • 24
      Seventh Chords and Sonata Form
      Continue your study of the Classical period with a look at one of the most important forms in piano music: the sonata-allegro. See why the seventh chords are so important for classical music, and then survey the life and music of Haydn. Practice Mozart's Sonata in C and Haydn's Dance in D Major. x
    • 25
      Sight-Reading and Technique
      It’s time. You’ve learned enough about music theory and notation that you are ready to tackle sight-reading head-on. Here, you will be introduced to several new sight-reading pieces as well as a technical étude. You’ll also continue your study of the Dance in D Major and the Sonata in C. x
    • 26
      The Romantic Period and Seventh-Chord Arpeggios
      Shift your attention from the Classical period to the Romantic era, roughly 1800 to 1910. After surveying some of the major historical and intellectual developments of the period, you'll begin work on seventh-chord arpeggios. You'll also learn rules for beginning pieces at the appropriate tempo. x
    • 27
      Extended Arpeggios and Pianist as Artist
      Continue your exploration of piano technique as it developed in the Romantic era. After some warm-up work on scales and extended arpeggios, you will find out what makes Chopin's style so interesting, and what made Liszt such a virtuoso. Conclude with a lullaby from Brahms. x
    • 28
      More Romantic Repertoire
      In this lesson, you will refine much of your existing repertoire. You'll then try your hand at Liszt's Liebestraum. While this piece can be quite challenging for students, Professor Pike has created a special arrangement designed for your current level of ability. Work on adding musical expression to these Romantic-era pieces. x
    • 29
      Sonata Form Revisited
      By now, you have learned enough music from the masters that you are participating in a musical tradition. Revisit the sonata form and consider the modified “mini sonatina” form. Practice with “Brahms’s Lullaby”, Gurlitt’s Waltz in C, Liszt’s Liebestraum, and a theme from Mozart’s Sonata in C. x
    • 30
      The Baroque Era and Harpsichords
      Artistic discipline is defined by having the persistence to continue learning difficult music over an extended period of time. This lesson gives you time to practice what you've learned before traveling back in time to the Baroque era, before the modern piano as we know it was invented. Survey the instruments and style of the period. x
    • 31
      Baroque Repertoire
      After warming up with a waltz, you’ll learn “Rameau’s Minuet,” a piece widely anthologized for music students. Then, go back to the Baroque to learn about Bach’s fugues and Pachelbel’s famous Canon in D. This lesson gives you a chance to refine your skills in harmonization. x
    • 32
      Deliberate Practice and Learning Music
      Through much of this course, you have worked on some challenging masterpieces, many of which require difficult hand shifts and much practice. Here, Professor Pike shares a few strategies for “deliberate practice,” a systematic way to help you through the challenges. Learn a new harmonization example in the key of E minor. x
    • 33
      The 20th Century and Modern Music
      Music in the 20th and 21st centuries comes in many different styles. Here, you will survey a few common trends and find out about some of the more highly regarded composers of the past century, including programmatic music of Jean Sibelius and Béla Bartók, as well as computer-generated sounds and non-traditional piano techniques. x
    • 34
      Chorale-Style Repertoire
      It's good to practice music from different eras to ensure your musical diet is well-balanced. Here, survey chorale-style piano music across the ages. You'll enjoy the hymn-like harmonies in Schumann's Chorale Opus 68 no. 4 as well as the Ode to Schumann. Then, turn to another, more challenging piece by Schumann. x
    • 35
      Impressionism and the Una Corda Pedal
      Like its counterparts in art and literature, impressionism is a powerful musical movement that conveys a vague aural picture through interesting chords and progressions. Claude Debussy is the master of impressionism, and you will review his approach—and see how una corda pedal can help you mirror his sound. x
    • 36
      Triplets and Continuing Piano Study
      Professor Pike concludes with a final rhythmic pattern—triplets. After playing a Hungarian dance, you will try your hand at Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, a fitting coda for a course that opened with the Ode to Joy. Reflect on what you’ve learned and discover how to continue your study of the piano after this course. x
  • Understanding Russia: A Cultural History

    Professor Lynne Ann Hartnett, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In a time when the eyes of the Western world are drawn to Russia and her role on the world stage, it’s amazing how little many of us really know about it. Blending history with cultural studies, the 24 lectures of Understanding Russia: A Cultural History bring you closer than ever to the Russian people through the poetry of Pushkin, the comfort of early folk tales, the faith of medieval iconography, the avant-garde films of Eisenstein, and more.

    View Lecture List (24)

    In a time when the eyes of the Western world are drawn to Russia and her role on the world stage, it’s amazing how little many of us really know about it. Blending history with cultural studies, the 24 lectures of Understanding Russia: A Cultural History bring you closer than ever to the Russian people through the poetry of Pushkin, the comfort of early folk tales, the faith of medieval iconography, the avant-garde films of Eisenstein, and more.

    View Lecture List (24)
    24 Lectures  |  Understanding Russia: A Cultural History
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      A Russian Past, the Putin Future
      As you start your journey into the heart of Russian history and culture, consider several themes you'll encounter throughout these lectures. Among them: the enormity of Russia's geography, its desire for power, and its search for an organic cultural identity. Then, explore the beginnings of Russia in the land known as Rus'. x
    • 2
      Ivan the Terrible's 500-Year Reign
      For better and worse, Ivan the Terrible’s reign has become a cultural and historical symbol of Russian leadership. Was he really terrible—or just awe-inspiring? How did he use cultural symbols to create a spectacle of autocracy? And to what extent did he set the standard for subsequent centuries of Russian leadership? x
    • 3
      The Russian Orthodox Church
      In this lecture, examine the fascinating relationship between the Russian state and the Russian Orthodox Church. Along the way, you'll assess how religion, as practiced by the Russian masses, changed church institutions (and how the Russian state responded in turn) and the extraordinary influence of the Russian church on state culture. x
    • 4
      Peter the Great and a European Empire
      What makes the Russian ruler Peter deserving of the title “great”? The answer lies in looking at how he transformed a minor power on the periphery of Europe into a formidable empire, how he embraced Western culture, and how he spearheaded transformations (including calendar reforms) to create a new European capital. x
    • 5
      Russia's Northern Window on Europe
      Modern Russian culture was born in the city of St. Petersburg, built on the shores of the Gulf of Finland in the early 18th century. It's here where you'll witness the dawning of the Russian Elizabethan Age: a time of extravagance and cultural energy that produced wonders in everything from architecture to opera. x
    • 6
      Nobility, the Tsar, and the Peasant
      The political alliance the Russian nobility forged with the Romanov regime facilitated Russian expansion—but at tremendous cost to the Russian masses. Here, Professor Hartnett explores some of the many fissures in the tsarist system that led to popular resentment of the Russian nobility and made the country ripe for revolution. x
    • 7
      The Authentic Russia: Popular Culture
      Russian popular culture, produced by the masses of uneducated peasants, can be described as a culture of sentimentality rooted in religious devotion and the agricultural calendar. Here, explore everything from superstitions and folk tales and Stenka Razin’s “myth of rebellion” to the popularity of Russian baths (banya), vodka, and nesting dolls (matryoshkas). x
    • 8
      Catherine the Great and the Enlightenment
      In this lecture, explore the powerful legacy of Catherine the Great, who would extend the empire westward and accomplish what even Peter the Great had been unable to do: establish Russian dominance of the southern regions. You'll also learn how Catherine fueled Enlightenment-inspired developments in politics, architecture, and more. x
    • 9
      Alexander Pushkin's Russia
      To understand the poet Alexander Pushkin’s literary significance, you must understand the Russia in which he lived. Here, explore how Pushkin (today recognized as Russia’s greatest poet) intersected with significant events, trends, and individuals, and how he created works including the novel Eugene Onegin and the poem, “The Bronze Horseman.” x
    • 10
      Alexander II, Nihilists, and Assassins
      Focus on the reign of Alexander II, who ruled Russia from 1855 to 1881. Central to this lecture are three questions: Why did this promising reign end so violently? Did Alexander II shape developments in literature and culture? How could Russia's last great tsar inaugurate a violent confrontation between the state and its people? x
    • 11
      The Age of Realism in Russian Art
      Dive into the age of artistic realism, whose artists are among the most celebrated in all of Russian culture. As you meet composers like Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, writers like Ivan Turgenev, and painters like Ilya Repin, you'll learn how artists found their muse in the history and traditions of Russia. x
    • 12
      Russian Fin de Siecle and the Silver Age
      By the end of the 19th century, Russian artists were helping to make Russian culture among the most exceptional in the world. Here, take a closer look at the cheeky apathy of Anton Chekhov's plays, the Bolshoi Theater and the Ballets Russes, decorative arts from the House of Faberge, and more. x
    • 13
      Empire across Two Continents
      Chart the tsars’ development of a grand Eurasian empire. You’ll consider the commonalities Russian colonizers shared with their Western counterparts, explore incursions into Alaska and Siberia, examine the Napoleonic and Russo-Turkish wars, and investigate the policy of “Russification,” designed to make the empire’s European areas “more Russian.” x
    • 14
      The Rise and Fall of the Romanovs
      Get the real story behind the Romanov dynasty, from its rise to power in 1613 to its bloody end in 1917—a tale filled with adventure, intrigue, romance, and heartbreak. It was this period that saw the Decembrist revolution, the assassination of Tsar Alexander II, and the machinations of the notorious Grigori Rasputin. x
    • 15
      Russian Radicals, War, and Revolution
      On October 26, 1917, a new era in Russian history began. In the first of two lectures on the October Revolution, explore the events that led up to this epoch-making moment, including the devastation of World War I, the repressive rule of Tsar Nicholas II, and the ideas of Vladimir Lenin. x
    • 16
      The October 1917 Revolution
      Examine the Bolshevik seizure of power during the October Revolution and its immediate aftermath. You'll explore the Bolsheviks' attempt to implement a utopian vision through the barrel of a gun, and you'll also investigate how the revolution created a system where violence was a typical tool of statecraft. x
    • 17
      Lenin and the Soviet Cultural Invasion
      Professor Hartnett reveals how Lenin and the Communist Party aimed to win the hearts and minds of the Soviet people through a cultural battle fought on every possible front. See how this battle was won through a militarized economy, propaganda radio, the renaming of streets, and the “secular sainthood” of Lenin. x
    • 18
      The Roaring Twenties, Soviet Style
      The Russian Revolution wasn’t just about changing politics. The Bolsheviks also attacked Russia’s traditional religious, sexual, and social norms. Here, examine how the Soviets built a new proletarian culture that had powerful ramifications for education, women, religion, folk songs—and even cinema. x
    • 19
      The Tyrant Is a Movie Buff: Stalinism
      Stalin and his cadre aspired to transform everyday Russian life (byt) in ways that brought forth such horrors as collectivization and the gulags. But, as you'll learn, this was also a period where the creative work and cultural influence of writers, composers, and painters were suppressed by the terrifying mandates of Socialist Realism. x
    • 20
      The Soviets' Great Patriotic War
      By the time World War II ended, the Soviets would lose 27 million men, women, and children from a total population of 200 million. In this lecture, examine Soviet life during the Great Patriotic War and investigate how culture (including poetry and film) was used in service of the war effort. x
    • 21
      With Khrushchev, the Cultural Thaw
      Nikita Khrushchev emerged from the power struggles after Stalin’s death with a daring denunciation of the dictator’s cult of terror and personality. As you examine Khrushchev’s liberalization of culture, you’ll also explore its limits, including the continuation of anti-Semitism from the Stalin era, embraced under the guise of “anti-cosmopolitanism.” x
    • 22
      Soviet Byt: Shared Kitchen, Stove, and Bath
      What was everyday Soviet life like during the Khrushchev and Brezhnev periods? How and where did people live? How did they spend their leisure time? Answers to these and other questions reveal the degree to which politics affected even seemingly apolitical areas of life. x
    • 23
      Intelligentsia, Dissidents, and Samizdat
      In this lecture, explore the culture of intellectual dissent in Russian history. Professor Hartnett reveals how Russia’s intellectuals and artists (including writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn and nuclear physicist Andrei Sakharov) played a unique, important role in challenging the status quo of autocratic rule—often at the expense of their freedom. x
    • 24
      Soviet Chaos and Russian Revenge
      On December 25, 1991, the Soviet Union came to an end. Follow the road that led to this moment under the policies of perestroika (restructuring the centrally-planned economy) and glasnost (removing rigid state censorship). Then, conclude with a look at the rise of a new popular leader: Vladimir Putin. x
  • How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide

    Professor Beth Cabrera, PhD

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    The profit of companies with the strongest focus on employee experience is about four times higher than the average. In How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader’s Guide, Professor Beth Cabrera provides a step-by-step guide to create a thriving work environment, based on the science of positive psychology. In the process, not only will your bottom line improve, but so will the lives of your employees—and your own life, as well.

    View Lecture List (12)

    The profit of companies with the strongest focus on employee experience is about four times higher than the average. In How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader’s Guide, Professor Beth Cabrera provides a step-by-step guide to create a thriving work environment, based on the science of positive psychology. In the process, not only will your bottom line improve, but so will the lives of your employees—and your own life, as well.

    View Lecture List (12)
    12 Lectures  |  How to Build a Thriving Workplace: A Leader's Guide
    Lecture Titles (12)
    • 1
      Workplace Well-Being: The New Frontier
      What's the next competitive frontier in business? It's the relationship between employee experience and company success. Learn about the exciting new research showing a clear link between employee well-being and your company's bottom line. x
    • 2
      Mindfulness at Work: The Power of Presence
      While most of us believe multi-tasking increases our productivity, scientific studies reveal the opposite. Explore why mindfulness has proven to be a better path to emotional well-being and optimal work performance. Discover how to develop and implement the practice of mindfulness in your life. x
    • 3
      Positive Outlook, Positive Performance
      Can starting your day off with a few smiles really make a difference in your work performance? Yes! Discover how positive emotions can impact our brain structure and chemistry, resulting in significant psychological, cognitive, social, and health benefits that can improve work performance. x
    • 4
      Fostering Employee Optimism and Hope
      Optimism and hope are two powerful ingredients in the recipe for a thriving workplace, and studies have confirmed their correlation to the bottom line. Explore the important differences between these two concepts and the specific ways in which employees can learn to shift from pessimistic or hopeless attitudes to more optimistic and hopeful ones. x
    • 5
      The Advantage of Workplace Relationships
      Our brains are wired for social interaction, and research has confirmed that our relationships with others significantly impact both our ability to thrive and our work performance. Find out how to foster high-quality social connections among employees and how those connections can have a positive impact. x
    • 6
      Encouraging Generosity and Compassion
      Scientists now believe nature rewarded not only the fittest, but also the kindest. Explore how to foster generosity and compassion in the workplace, and the many ways in which these qualities lead to stronger relationships and greater productivity. Also, explore the benefits of self-compassion. x
    • 7
      Creating an Inspiring Learning Environment
      We all want to learn and grow throughout our careers, yet some people are more open to learning new concepts and skills than others. Find out how leadership can create an environment of psychological safety, curiosity, and creativity, which will inspire all employees to learn, grow, and thrive. x
    • 8
      Engaging Your Workforce: The Power of Flow
      We’re familiar with the concept of athletes and artists experiencing “flow” or being “in the zone.” They report performing almost effortlessly while time goes by unnoticed when they are fully engaged in their work. Discover how creating more opportunities for flow at work and adopting a strengths-based leadership approach can benefit both your employees and your organization. x
    • 9
      The Need for Meaning: Making Work Matter
      Many people look to their work for a sense of fulfillment and meaning. But meaning doesn't come from the specific task performed; it is derived from an individual's understanding of the task's purpose. Explore the many ways to help employees understand how their work and the company's collective activities serve colleagues, customers, and community. x
    • 10
      Promoting Workplace Resilience
      The modern workplace can be a stressful environment. But whether that stress is harmful or helpful depends on an individual’s mindset—a mindset that can be changed. Examine specific strategies that can help develop resilience. A more resilient workforce can lead to increased performance and decreased employee turnover. x
    • 11
      Strategies for Employee Health
      The research is clear that a few well-planned front-end investments in employee health can prevent significant costs later on. Explore the many ways in which workplace environment and culture can promote better health through exercise, eating habits, sleep, rest, and relaxation. x
    • 12
      Autonomy: Empowering Employees to Succeed
      Autonomy—the feeling of being in control and having the ability to accomplish your goals—is one of the most powerful components of well-being, and companies where employees have greater autonomy significantly outperform competitors. Learn the best ways to give up a bit of control, even though it’s difficult for most of us. It will be well worth the effort. x