On Sale Through August 16. Announcing 3 New Releases. Renaissance: The Transformation of the West; Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies; Craftsy: Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes.
On Sale Through August 16. Announcing 3 New Releases. Renaissance: The Transformation of the West; Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies; Craftsy: Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes.
  • Renaissance: The Transformation of the West

    Professor Jennifer McNabb, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    In the 48 lectures of Renaissance: The Transformation of the West, award-winning Professor Jennifer McNabb guides you through centuries of exhilarating change in Europe, focusing on often-unexplored or overlooked areas, including the role of women in the Renaissance, the lives of the poor and elite, Renaissance home and family life, and the connections between the Renaissance and the Reformation.

    View Lecture List (48)

    In the 48 lectures of Renaissance: The Transformation of the West, award-winning Professor Jennifer McNabb guides you through centuries of exhilarating change in Europe, focusing on often-unexplored or overlooked areas, including the role of women in the Renaissance, the lives of the poor and elite, Renaissance home and family life, and the connections between the Renaissance and the Reformation.

    48 Lectures  |  Renaissance: The Transformation of the West
    Lecture Titles (48)
    • 1
      The Spirit of Renaissance
      How did the Renaissance—as it occurred in Italy and in other parts of Europe—pioneer a new way of thinking about history itself? Who, exactly, was the typical “Renaissance Man”? Get answers to these and other questions about the Renaissance’s powerful fusion of classical and medieval worldviews. x
    • 2
      Rebirth: Classical Values Made New
      Here, consider how the key contexts and values of the European Renaissance set the stage for a new era of questions. The two chief examples you'll use to chart the origins of the European Renaissance are the Black Death and the letters of Petrarch. x
    • 3
      The Medieval Roots of Italian Renaissance
      Discover why the Renaissance first bloomed in, of all places, Italy. First, look at the politics and economics of medieval Italian states. Then, explore how the legacies of antiquity gained traction throughout the peninsula. Finally, consider the influence of trade revivals, a dynamic social order, and the profits from holy wars. x
    • 4
      The Rise of the Humanists
      Focus on one of the most-challenging foundational concepts of the Renaissance: humanism. Professor McNabb outlines how and why education underwent its extreme makeover, explores the fields that dominated this new way of learning, and introduces you to humanist schools and schoolmasters. x
    • 5
      Renaissance Florence: Age of Gold
      Florence, defined by hierarchy and inequality, has become synonymous with the Italian Renaissance. How did this happen? Here, you will explore the complex political journey of this “most noble” of cities from model republic to six decades of domination by the iconic Medici family, and back again. x
    • 6
      Renaissance Venice: More Serene Republic
      Dive into the byzantine history and legacy of Venice during the period of the Renaissance, when the city managed to prosper even without that most valuable of commodities: land. Learn how Venice was shaped by its merchant elite, how it joined the ranks of Italian city-states, and how Venice experienced humanism. x
    • 7
      Renaissance Rome and the Papal States
      Investigate how the new learning in Rome challenged the wisdom of centuries of spiritual authority as the capital of Christianity. While exploring Rome's papal history, encounter the noble family who considered it their birthright to wield control over the city: the infamous Borgias (including Cesare and Pope Alexander VI). x
    • 8
      Renaissance Italy's Princes and Rivals
      In this lecture, turn to the other great power players in Renaissance Italy, including the kingdoms of Naples and Sicily and the duchy of Milan. Then, examine the eclipse of the age of the republics by the age of the tyrants: elite families who used cunning to obtain—and maintain—positions of authority. x
    • 9
      Renaissance Man as Political Animal
      Renaissance Man can perhaps best be understood as an educational and political ideal, someone as schooled in warfare as he was in classical antiquity. Here, meet three men whose lives and works exemplify different iterations of the Renaissance Man in action: Niccolo Machiavelli, Baldassare Castiglione, and Leon Battista Alberti. x
    • 10
      Women and the Italian Renaissance Court
      Step inside 15th- and 16th-century Italian courts to investigate how a number of smart, powerful, and cunning women helped steer the course of the Renaissance. Among the women you'll meet are Isabella d'Este, noted for her trendsetting sense of style and substance, and the Italian poet, Veronica Franco. x
    • 11
      Painting in the Early Italian Renaissance
      Using the careers and works of artists like Masaccio, Giotto, and Botticelli, discover how early Renaissance painting innovated and celebrated the experience of being human. In addition, you'll examine the business side of art, including matters of patronage that were central to artists during the Italian Renaissance. x
    • 12
      Painting in the High Italian Renaissance
      Turn now to the High Italian Renaissance era of painting, credited with a veritable artistic revolution in the art form. During this time, artists like Leonardo and Michelangelo were celebrities who rubbed shoulders with the rich and powerful. Not to be overlooked: the role of women painters, including Artemisia Gentileschi. x
    • 13
      Italian Sculpture, Architecture, and Music
      Learn how Renaissance architects and city planners—including Donato Bramante, Sebastian Serlio, and Andrea Palladio—imbued sculpture and architecture with tremendous ideological and practical power. Then, discover how Renaissance musicians helped move music out of the religious sphere and into the princely courts. x
    • 14
      Letters in the Italian Renaissance
      In this lecture, examine the lives and careers of a trio of fascinating Renaissance authors who used their words to help write the Renaissance into the pages of history. Professor McNabb covers the merchant, Francesco Datini; the artist-biographer, Giorgio Vasari; and the Florentine historian, Francesco Guicciardini. x
    • 15
      Renaissance Statecraft: A New Path
      Venture to the other side of the Alps for a closer look at what’s known as the “Northern Renaissance.” You’ll chart the political evolution of the region from barbarism to feudalism to feudal monarchy, explore why feudal monarchies trended toward weakness, and get a brief overview of power struggles among northern kings. x
    • 16
      European Renaissance Monarchies
      Turn the lens on the monarchical rivalries of the Northern Renaissance, which changed the course of Western politics as much as the rivalries in Italy. Focus on the rule of Isabella of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon, the rise of the Tudors in England, and the waxing power of France. x
    • 17
      The Birth of the Christian Renaissance
      Consider the development of humanist thought in the north, which commingled with the idea of a Christian rebirth and a reordering of society's morals that planted the seeds for the Reformation. Among the inquisitive and critical Christian humanists you'll encounter are Erasmus and Thomas More. x
    • 18
      Northern Renaissance Art and Music
      Using works by Matthias Grünewald, Jan van Eyck, Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Hans Holbein the Younger, and others, explore how northern artists breathed artistic life into themes of faith, duty, and fidelity. Then, visit the court of the dukes of Burgundy for a look at the music of Guillaume Dufay. x
    • 19
      Northern Renaissance Literature and Drama
      Meet the Northern Renaissance authors and playwrights who offered entertainments and edification in the page and on the stage—authors who would become some of the greatest writers in Western history. These geniuses include François Rabelais; Miguel de Cervantes; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; and, of course, William Shakespeare. x
    • 20
      Did Women Have a Renaissance?
      Examine the “woman question”: the contemporary debate about Renaissance women’s abilities and deficiencies. The question, as you’ll learn, was really about access to education. Along the way, you’ll consider whether we can say women had a renaissance of their own—and why that issue still matters today. x
    • 21
      Renaissance Life: The Rural Experience
      In the first of several sketches on the conditions of Renaissance life, explore the geographical setting where the vast majority of the European population lived at the time: the countryside. You'll look at festivals and feast days, types of settlements, the competition for land, and the peasant rebellions that followed. x
    • 22
      Renaissance Life: The Urban Experience
      How exactly do we define “urban” during the Renaissance? How did three, early modern institutions—craft guilds, confraternities, and public drinking establishments—help to define the urban experience? Find out in Professor McNabb’s fascinating lecture on the urban experiences of rich and poor alike. x
    • 23
      Renaissance Life: Crime, Deviance, and Honor
      Continue exploring daily life during the Renaissance by turning to issues of personal crisis—and their consequences. In studying crime, deviance, and Renaissance attitudes toward honor and shame, you’ll discover how early modern communities and authorities sought to order the world and project their morality. x
    • 24
      Renaissance Life: Marriage
      Marriage during the Renaissance was a major component of the “good life” during the period. It was also a complicated affair shaped by the intersection of private desires with more practical considerations. Delve into the ways Renaissance societies constructed marriage, and how marriage customs differed depending on geographic location. x
    • 25
      Renaissance Life: Home and Hearth
      What was domestic life like during the Renaissance? Get a feel for it with this lecture that highlights several topics related to home and hearth. These topics include: food culture (with a focus on baking), the practicalities of dress, the details about childrearing, and the role of servants and retainers. x
    • 26
      Renaissance Faith: Medieval Contexts
      Examine the two medieval heavyweights whose legendary disputes illustrate some key points about faith and power in the Renaissance world: King Philip IV of France and Pope Boniface VIII. Then, learn how new and revitalized orders—including Ci stercians and Franciscans—attracted adherents in astonishing numbers. x
    • 27
      Renaissance Faith: The Papacy
      The particular conditions of 15th- and 16th-century Italy allowed the popes to augment their power and fashion themselves as rulers. Here, explore papal programs designed to cement Rome as Christendom's true capital (after a century of geographic dislocations) and their architects, including Nicholas V, Pius II, and Sixtus IV. x
    • 28
      Renaissance Faith: Religious Uniformity
      Take a closer look at the ways in which European political authorities dealt with matters of faith in their drive to enhance authority. You'll learn about English theologian John Wyclif's challenges to traditional Christian authority, the persecution of European Jews, and the birth of the Inquisition. x
    • 29
      Luther: Breaking the Christian Consensus
      The Renaissance is vital to understanding how Martin Luther took on the church and not only survived but thrived, initiating a protest movement that put an end to more than 1,000 years of Christian consensus. Start considering Martin Luther as a man of a very particular historical moment. x
    • 30
      Radical Reform in Renaissance Europe
      Professor McNabb highlights the many fractures that strengthened the shockwaves Martin Luther created in Christianity—some of which he couldn’t foresee or control. Learn the importance of the Anabaptists, the tumult of the German Peasants’ War, and why Martin Luther resists easy demonization or lionization. x
    • 31
      Renaissance and Reformation: Connections
      Turn your attention to various calls for a reformation of faith identifiably shaped by the new learning of the Renaissance and the ideas of Huldrych Zwingli and John Calvin. Calvin's ideas traveled on to Scotland, where the Reformation, working in tandem with powerful men, toppled a monarch from the throne. x
    • 32
      English Reformation
      Embark on an exciting look at the causes, processes, and consequences of the Tudor reformations, featuring some of the most famous personages in English history, including Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell, and Elizabeth I. What made this path to reform so different from events playing elsewhere on the European continent? x
    • 33
      Catholic Reformations: The Road to Trent
      Why didn’t the Catholic Church defeat the Reformation? Why didn’t it do more to stop Martin Luther? Cultivate a new way of thinking about the papal response to the theological revolution—epitomized by the Council of Trent, which created a Roman Catholic identity. x
    • 34
      Catholic Reformations: Spiritual Revival
      In the face of the slings and arrows of Protestant reformers, the Catholic Church lauded a number of individuals whose commitment to the “true faith” offered a balance to the Reformation that threatened to bury Catholicism. Learn how men and women became exemplars of piety during the Catholic Reformation. x
    • 35
      Reformation Culture: Continuity and Change
      Get a feel for what it was like to be a Protestant or Catholic in Reformation Europe. Your focus here: the culture wars that accompanied this period, including the rise of iconoclasts like Andreas Bodenstein von Karlstadt, the use of vernacular language in religious services, and the dawn of Baroque art. x
    • 36
      Renaissance War and Peace: Diplomacy
      In the first of several lectures on the interaction among the states of early modern Europe, learn how diplomacy operated in a Europe increasingly characterized by religious dissention and violence. Central to this subject is the important role of permanent ambassadors and other diplomatic figures. x
    • 37
      The French Wars of Religion
      Religious violence kept France in its grip for an entire century. Discover how the French Wars of Religion sparked both bloodshed and a new way of thinking about the relationship between individuals and the figures of power to whom they owed allegiance (a favorite topic of Renaissance writers). x
    • 38
      The Dutch Revolt
      Witness a number of factors you've examined in other lectures collide in a fascinating (if also, destructive and costly) way during the Dutch Revolt. You'll also see a glimmer of the new demands of early modern warfare and the role of print in presenting a platform for action. x
    • 39
      The Spanish Armada
      Get the full story behind the Spanish Armada by paying attention to three key issues: the rivalry of Philip of Spain and Elizabeth I of England, the Spanish Armada's fateful engagement with the English in the summer of 1588, and the untidy consequences of Spain's defeat. x
    • 40
      The Thirty Years' War
      Welcome to ground zero of religious warfare during the Age of Reformation: The Thirty Years' War, which would engulf most of the European continent. By the end of this lecture, you'll learn how this struggle drew the map of Europe that would exist until the French Revolution. x
    • 41
      Renaissance at Arms: The Military Revolution
      What, exactly, constitutes a military revolution? What are the four major changes that happened between 1560 and 1660 that transformed warfare? How did a typical warrior from the 15th century compare to his counterpart 200 years later? How did large gunpowder weaponry influence other military developments? x
    • 42
      Renaissance and the Birth of Modern Science
      Professor McNabb guides you through the intersection of Renaissance values and patronage with the new ways of thinking about the universe brought about by the Scientific Revolution. See how many of the activities and individuals associated with this period exhibit key dynamics of the Renaissance covered in other lectures. x
    • 43
      Renaissance and Magic: Witchcraft
      Between 1450 and 1700, somewhere between 40,000 to 60,000 people were executed on charges of witchcraft. Why did ideas about demons and witches have such an appeal in early modern Europe? How did these beliefs produce a new type of criminal to be targeted by secular and spiritual authorities? x
    • 44
      Renaissance Encounters with Islam
      From the Reconquista to the collapse of Christian Constantinople to the rule of Suleiman the Magnificent, examine the relationship between Christians and Muslims during the early modern period—a relationship of competition and coexistence that shaped the development of the Western tradition. x
    • 45
      Renaissance and Exploration: Motives
      The Age of Discovery can be thought of, in many ways, as a Renaissance project. Here, you'll learn many of the values, motivations, and conflicts that fostered preconditions for European exploration, including a curiosity about the natural world, technological innovations, and the underlying quest for glory and riches. x
    • 46
      Renaissance and Exploration: New Horizons
      How did Portugal and Spain set out to build overseas empires? Examine the first round of European expansion in the Americas and the Indian Ocean basin in the broader contexts of the Renaissance. Along the way, follow the journeys and discoveries of explorers like Christopher Columbus and Francisco Pizarro. x
    • 47
      Early Modern Power: The New Global Rivalries
      Turn now to other European states joining the race for global empire. Consider the developments of three states—the Dutch Republic, Britain, and France—in an age of change, and learn how they helped spell the demise of the Ancien Régime and the birth of the modern world. x
    • 48
      Renaissance Legacy: Burckhardt and Beyond
      Return to the critical question that started this entire course: Have we reached the end of the Renaissance? Professor McNabb uses this concluding lecture to reflect on the meaning of the Renaissance for its contemporaries, for subsequent historians like Jacob Burckhardt, and for us in the 21st century. x
  • Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies

    Instructor Tammy Yard-McCracken, Psy.D., LPC

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies is a comprehensive introduction to self-defense, and will change the way you look at the world and think about yourself. Taught by acclaimed self-defense instructor, Krav Maga expert, and psychotherapist Dr. Tammy Yard-McCracken, these 24 interactive lessons will give you an arsenal of physical and mental strategies to prepare you to defend yourself and your loved ones.

    View Lecture List (25)

    Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies is a comprehensive introduction to self-defense, and will change the way you look at the world and think about yourself. Taught by acclaimed self-defense instructor, Krav Maga expert, and psychotherapist Dr. Tammy Yard-McCracken, these 24 interactive lessons will give you an arsenal of physical and mental strategies to prepare you to defend yourself and your loved ones.

    25 Lectures  |  Understanding and Applying Self-Defense Strategies
    Lecture Titles (25)
    • 1
      Waking Up Your Natural Human Animal
      At its core, self-defense means learning to understand violence and carry out decisions necessary to keep yourself and your loved ones safe. The great news is that you already have the ability to do this. In this first lesson, tap into your own body's resources and access your inner animal. x
    • 2
      Other Bodies as “Meat Puzzles”
      Self-defense requires an understanding of our physical selves. Our bodies are essentially “meat puzzles”—blood, flesh, and bone assembled for optimal living, but with a variety of weaknesses. Practice drills of timing, balance, and more to learn how your body works, and how to identify weaknesses in others. x
    • 3
      Natural Targets on the Human Body
      Continue your study of the meat puzzle by reflecting on targets. Consider how bones line up to create strength, how to spot weak structures in opponents, and ways to maintain balance in yourself. Develop “targeting” as a skill through shadow boxing, combinations, and blindfold drills. x
    • 4
      Weaponizing Your Body
      Lunges, strikes, punches, kicks: Your body has numerous weapons at its disposal. Here, you will practice a number of drills to build the movements and ingrain patterns—a.k.a., muscle memory. Put it all together with combination patterns and environmental scenarios. Then, find out the best things to do after you disable your opponent in an attack. x
    • 5
      Generating Power by Playing Smart
      One important aspect of self-defense is understanding how your body will behave in an attack. Your “survival stress response,” or SSR, is the body’s natural alarm system—a flood of hormones that will change the way you think and act. Get to know your SSR as you study ways to generate power, from kinetic chains to exploiting gravity. x
    • 6
      Expanding What You Are Willing to See and Do
      In a self-defense encounter, you enter a decision cycle called the “OODA loop”—observe, orient, decide, act. Because every second counts, the quicker you can move from observe and orient to decisions and action, the better off you will be. In this lesson, you will explore ways to expand what you see—because how you see controls what you can do. x
    • 7
      Responding to the Ambush
      Round out your study of the body’s survival stress response and the OODA decision cycle. The term “reactionary gap” refers to the distance between the awareness that something is happening and the moment we take action; training and repetition are ways to close this gap. Learn responses to bear hugs and other ambush techniques, and practice your reps to condition yourself. x
    • 8
      How Violence Occurs
      Here, shift your attention from your own body's physical reaction and reflect on the nature of violence. Although the experience of violence can be chaotic, the process of violence is somewhat logical. Think about the motivations and goals of predators, and unpack the six primary elements common in the process of violent attacks. x
    • 9
      Predator Behavior and Violence
      Continue your examination of predator motivations. Some predators, like muggers or carjackers, want resources, whereas others may simply enjoy violence. Delving into the ways they see the world can help you better understand your surroundings and avoid dangerous situations. Consider habitual areas, natural lines of drift, and the role of chance. x
    • 10
      Social Conflict and Violence
      The “asocial violence” of the previous lesson occurred wherever the predator is hunting. In this lesson, Dr. Yard-McCracken explores violence in social settings, from the primal chest-thumping of drunks in a bar, to the thirst for vengeance after a betrayal, to violence as a means to achieve social status. Learn “tactical breathing” to de-escalate yourself. x
    • 11
      Escape and Evasion
      Because getting home safely is the primary goal of self-defense, escape and evasion are critical tools for personal safety. The four elements of a violent encounter are the target (i.e., you), the threat, the environment, and luck. See how escape and evasion tools apply to each of these elements. x
    • 12
      How and Why Conflict Escalates to Violence
      Why do conflicts escalate to violence? From a psychological standpoint, we all have a hierarchy of needs, with survival and security at the base of the pyramid, and belonging and esteem toward the top. Reflect on the nature of tribal behavior, how humans “other” people outside their group, and the connection between “othering” and violence. x
    • 13
      De-escalating Your Monkey Brain
      One way of thinking about humans is that we have a lizard brain (focused on survival), a monkey brain (focused on emotion and tribal behavior), and a rational brain. The “monkey brain” is an evolutionary survival mechanism that can get us into trouble by escalating conflicts. Learn to control this part of your brain to prevent violence. x
    • 14
      When and How to De-escalate Threats
      In the moments before an attack, you won’t have much time to reflect on the threat. In this lesson, examine ways to read nonverbal communication and practice what law enforcement professionals call “intelligence gathering.” Listen to what someone says, watch how they move, and recognize threats in the making. x
    • 15
      Verbal Boundary Setting and Predator Test
      Physical training is about winning in a conflict, but the real win is to avoid the conflict altogether. “Boundary setting” is a strategy for bridging the gap, helping you ward off threats before they turn into violence. Gain a few insights into how to set boundaries with potential threats—and how to recognize predators. x
    • 16
      Physical Boundary Setting and Defenses
      If verbal boundary setting doesn’t work, physical boundary setting may help you defend yourself without coming to blows. Find out how to get “tactical ready”—a guard-up fighting stance that shows you know what you’re doing, without escalating the conflict. Explore basic parries and positions that will help you play defense. x
    • 17
      Ethical Articulation Skills in Self-Defense
      What are the legal and ethical implications of self-defense? This course is not about the legal term “self-defense,” but rather is about understanding how to make decisions to keep yourself safe. Here, Dr. Yard-McCracken offers a few rules of thumb for understanding the ethical parameters of defending yourself. x
    • 18
      Physical Cheats in Self-Defense
      The rules of fair play are ingrained in all of us from an early age, but self-defense is about getting home safely by any means necessary. You don't have to (and likely shouldn't) fight fair to get away from a violent attack. Examine a variety of creative ways to attack the threat's body, moving from pain to injury to damage. x
    • 19
      Joint Locks in Self-Defense
      Joint locks are an unconventional but potentially effective way to fight. Apply what you know about the body's physical structure to practice locks on hinging joints (elbows and knees), ball and socket joints (shoulders and hips), and gliding joints (wrists and ankles). See full demonstrations of each lock as you learn them. x
    • 20
      Preparing for Defense on the Ground
      The game of defense is different if you are on the ground. You have less time, and will more quickly run out of energy, strength, and opportunity. As you'll see in this lesson, ground work is something of a paradox: It's seriously uncomfortable, but the more comfortable you get with it, you'll find it's also a seriously fun way to play with the meat puzzle. x
    • 21
      The Ground Problem from Start to Finish
      Continue your study of defense from the ground. Success on the ground means surviving to your feet, so follow the process of defense from start to finish. Unpack issues of mobility, flexibility, pass-throughs, controlled falls, and more, and look at techniques from wrestlers and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. x
    • 22
      Weapons in Self-Defense
      Guns and knives are obvious weapons for defense, but they are bound by laws of Every Day Carry (EDC). When it comes to defense, improvised weapons such as pens, keychains, and coin purses can be just as helpful. Survey potential stabbing weapons, blunt-force objects, and other tools at your disposal. x
    • 23
      Protecting Your Very Important People
      Avoiding a conflict can be as simple as running away, but this becomes challenging if you have a partner or children with you. As someone who has studied self-defense, you become the person capable of taking and maintaining control of the situation. Enhance your skills of observation, prevention—and physical defense. x
    • 24
      Adapt Your Self-Defense to the Environment
      Now that you've reached the end of the course, you are your own bodyguard, armed with a toolkit of ways to de-escalate conflicts and defend yourself if a physical threat presents itself. Watch a few final demonstrations to help you put together everything you've learned in different environments, and then consider the arsenal you have developed and what you can continue to learn. x
    • 25
      Bonus: Extended Warm-Up with Adaptations
      Full warm-up session with adaptations and modifications. x
  • Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes

    Taught By Multiple Professors

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Whether you’re sketching castles on the cliffs, chateaus in the countryside, or churches in your city, Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes, led by four accomplished artists, is essential to elevating your drawing to the next level.

    View Lecture List (34)

    Whether you’re sketching castles on the cliffs, chateaus in the countryside, or churches in your city, Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes, led by four accomplished artists, is essential to elevating your drawing to the next level.

    34 Lectures  |  Sketching People, Places, and Landscapes
    Lecture Titles (34)
    • 1
      Finding the Perfect Place
      Meet James Richards and begin by exploring the ingredients that make a place perfect for sketching. From graphic elements and repetition to color and movement, learn to see a space with an artist’s eye. Plus, learn to select a “stimulus-rich” environment, perfect for capturing energy. x
    • 2
      Drawing People in the City
      Public spaces wouldn't exist without people. Learn some basic building blocks for drawing believable people and crowds. Learn proper proportions and understand how to create a sense of depth within a crowd using your eye level line, diminishing size, and overlapping. Learn a quick shorthand for capturing people on the move. x
    • 3
      Buildings as Backdrop
      Learn to draw large, impressive buildings without getting overwhelmed by the architectural details. Follow along as Jim takes you through drawing Denver's Union Station by first breaking the building into basic shapes and then simplifying details into a visual texture. x
    • 4
      The Entourage
      The entourage is the supporting cast that brings visual energy to a scene. In this lesson, learn to draw trees and cars step by step. Then, look for elements that are unique to your city or space. Plus, learn how to position elements within your frame to better serve the drawing. x
    • 5
      Adding Color
      Color can really bring your sketches to life. In this lesson, you'll learn to make strategic decisions about where to add darks and colors. Use watercolor washes to create a vibrant look to your drawing. Then, refine the details with more opaque colors. x
    • 6
      Hitting the Streets: On Location
      In this lesson, hit the streets and put it all together. Get over your fears about sketching in public as you join Jim on Denver's 16th Street Mall. Learn helpful hints and tools and get tips on determining where to start. Plus, get a step-by-step approach to bringing a lively city scene to life. x
    • 7
      Thumbnails & Composition
      Meet your instructor, sketch artist, and graphic designer Shari Blaukopf, and learn how to compose your sketches on the page. Shari shows you how to assess the scene in front of you before roughing in valuable details in the form of quick, informative thumbnails. x
    • 8
      Drawing Façades
      Whether you're sketching skyscrapers or a small strip of row houses, Shari shows you the best techniques for breaking up buildings into manageable proportions and basic shapes. Learn how to subdivide your sketch before starting to add specific textures and details in ink. x
    • 9
      Urban Texture
      Add a vibrant splash of color to your work as you integrate watercolor into your sketches. Shari walks you through the steps needed to capture the look of a wide variety of building materials ranging from stone facades to metal awnings, and she'll help you bring greater dimension to your scene. x
    • 10
      Doors & Windows
      Windows and doors add a great deal of character to each city neighborhood, and Shari shows you how to observe and capture those unique details with flair. Learn how to study the structure of each door and window, add color washes to enhance areas of light and shadow, and explore ways to depict reflections. x
    • 11
      Details That Give Cities Life
      There's no shortage of fascinating details when you sketch in an urban area. Learn how to incorporate a symphony of people, pets, foliage, power lines, and much more into your scene without overwhelming your drawing with minutiae. Shari also shares professional tips on how to render signage and lettering. x
    • 12
      Light & Shadow
      Delve deeper into ways to depict light and shadow, which can transform an ordinary sketch into a true work of art. Shari helps you identify the best ways to record shadow patterns as you sketch, and how to mix and apply paint to create transparent shadows or large, dark shadows. x
    • 13
      Panoramic Cityscapes
      In the final lesson, step back from the immediacy of street scenes to gain a larger view of your city or town. Shari shares helpful techniques for creating panoramic scenes, beginning with identifying the foreground, middle ground, and background elements and finding key focal points. x
    • 14
      Choosing & Using Sketchbooks
      Meet your instructor, sketch artist Paul Heaston, as you discover the joy that sketching can offer and how it can improve your skills by leaps and bounds. You'll begin with an overview of Paul's favorite sketchbook and media choices before loosening up your drawing hand with some contour drawings. x
    • 15
      Sketching with Pencil
      Indulge in one of sketching's most joyfully simple forms: carrying a pencil and sketchbook into the field to explore your surroundings. Paul explains graphite grading scales and shows you how to use this forgiving medium to refine your skills in perspective, distance, and more. You'll learn how to create emphasis and dimension using a variety of line weights and textural details, gaining confidence as you practice. x
    • 16
      Pen & Ink, Light & Shadow
      Gain the courage to leave your eraser behind and dive into ink sketches. Paul shares professional tips for developing realistic light, shadow, contour, and value using a variety of pen types and sizes. Beginners and expert artists alike will learn valuable hatching techniques as Paul demonstrates remarkable quick and effective shading methods. x
    • 17
      Color Your World with Watercolors
      Add color and character to your sketchbook with a bright and versatile watercolor palette. Paul demonstrates ways to apply washes and control your paints using helpful tips that will ensure a fun sketching session. Whether you're using color to fill large spaces or simply accentuating details, Paul's techniques will help you apply watercolor masterfully. x
    • 18
      Sketching on Location
      Pack your bag for the great outdoors as you employ Paul's tips for sketching comfortably and quickly. You'll learn what tools you'll need and anticipate the creature comforts that will come in handy for sketching sessions before assessing your locations for light and shade. Next, discover pro tips for accurately capturing both the permanent and fleeting objects in your scene, including parked cars and people who are strolling by. x
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      Composing in the Field
      Explore ways to use a viewfinder and your imagination to create a unique and compelling composition for each sketch. Paul shares important considerations for your location and field of view, as well as valuable composition tips that can transform a seemingly simple sketch into a dynamic work of art. Work with horizontal, vertical, cropped, and panoramic scenes as you create thumbnails to take each composition for a test drive. x
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      Location Sketching Process
      Examine the construction of a sketch from start to finish as you block in the simple shapes and values in your scene. Next, work from the foreground to the background as you develop basic forms, training your eye to see what's really there as you work. You'll learn how to infuse character into your sketch with meaningful details, resulting in sketches that range from the whimsical minutiae of your everyday life to evocative snapshots of your favorite memories. x
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      Shari's Sketchbooks
      Meet Shari Blaukopf, expert sketcher and graphic designer. Shari begins by introducing the tools of her trade: the various sketchbooks, pencils, watercolors, and brushes she takes with her everywhere. You'll also get to see a few of her incredible sketches. x
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      Composition
      Join Shari in the field as she scouts the beautiful Colorado landscape for a perfect scene. Begin with a quick compositional sketch to help determine the orientation of your drawing. Then, see how to create a value sketch, a helpful roadmap to completing your final drawing. x
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      Skies
      Look out the window and you’ll see that no two skies are the same. In this lesson, Shari shows you how to sketch four separate skies—morning, neutral, stormy, and skies with fluffy clouds—each with its own unique challenges. Plus, learn how to use different marks to create depth in your drawings. x
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      Big Shapes
      With your skies painted, it's time to work on the large middle ground and foreground shapes. Shari revisits her value sketch of the breathtaking Flatirons to add in sun-drenched rock formations. You'll also discover Shari's method of illustrating distant mountain ranges and large foreground trees. x
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      Texture
      Enliven your scenes and give them a sense of perspective by adding texture. Watch and learn Shari's effective method of creating a variety of textures. Then, discover how to delineate foreground elements before examining the effects you can create using both wet and dry brushes. x
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      Adding Depth with Value
      Learn how to add depth to your sketches with value. Using her Flatirons drawing as an example, Shari shows how to make jagged rocks even craggier while maintaining variety in the darker tones. Plus, practice Shari's technique of adding contrast to the foreground with ink. x
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      Expressing Unique Moments
      Discover the benefits of working with a limited palette. Shari shows you her process of using three colors to enhance one of her completed sketches. In addition, you'll learn expert tips on sketching everyday scenes in new, exciting ways. x
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      Measuring Accurate Proportions
      Meet architectural illustrator Stephanie Bower and start learning how to apply basic perspective principles to your sketching. Ease into the process with head-on elevation views. Stephanie shows you how to quickly and accurately measure an object's proportions before blocking in simple shapes and details. x
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      Building a Sketch in Layers
      Whether you're sketching the Taj Mahal, an ornate chateau, or buildings in your hometown, Stephanie shares tips and tricks for effectively capturing the scene. Learn how to break a complex facade into basic geometric shapes. Then, discover Stephanie's technique for adding multiple layers of detail. x
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      Concepts of Perspective Space
      Deepen your understanding of perspective as you practice sketching locations from aerial, eye-level, and worm's-eye vantage points. With Stephanie's expert guidance, you'll see how to achieve a sense of depth from a variety of perspectives using size, spacing, and vanishing points. x
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      Perspective Angles
      Feeling overwhelmed by the complexity of a scene? Stephanie demonstrates how to develop the basic foundation of a sketch in three easy steps. You'll also get detailed explanations on how to identify and work with one-point and two-point perspectives. x
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      Using Watercolor
      Once you've finished your sketch, enliven your work by adding watercolor. Get tips on selecting the right paper, pencils, paints, and brushes; then, learn simple techniques for mixing colors while creating a classic color wheel. Plus, find out how to effectively portray shade and shadow with watercolor paints. x
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      Location Sketching: Interior
      Go on location with Stephanie and practice drawing interior spaces using the techniques you've learned so far. You'll get step-by-step instruction along the way, from blocking in basic shapes and measuring for proportion to sketching smaller details and adding watercolor to complete the look. x
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      Location Sketching: Streetscape
      Move outdoors and apply your perspective skills to a bustling streetscape. Stephanie guides you through the process as she demonstrates how to determine the vanishing point before sketching in the basic shapes of buildings and alleyways. Add layers of shading and detail, then apply watercolor for striking results. x