4 New Great Courses on Sale Now! Ancient Civilizations of North America; iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation; Graphic Design Fundamentals; Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language
4 New Great Courses on Sale Now! Ancient Civilizations of North America; iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation; Graphic Design Fundamentals; Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language
  • Ancient Civilizations of North America

    Professor Edwin Barnhart, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Most of what we’ve been taught about the native cultures of North America came from reports authored by the conquerors and colonizers who destroyed them. Now, in Ancient Civilizations of North America, Professor Edwin Barnhart, Director of the Maya Exploration Center, reveals the astounding true accomplishments of these ancient cultures—vibrant cities, agriculture, art, large-scale earthen pyramids, astronomical observatories, and the source of some of our most basic “American” values.

    View Lecture List (24)

    Most of what we’ve been taught about the native cultures of North America came from reports authored by the conquerors and colonizers who destroyed them. Now, in Ancient Civilizations of North America, Professor Edwin Barnhart, Director of the Maya Exploration Center, reveals the astounding true accomplishments of these ancient cultures—vibrant cities, agriculture, art, large-scale earthen pyramids, astronomical observatories, and the source of some of our most basic “American” values.

    24 Lectures  |  Ancient Civilizations of North America
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      The Unknown Story of Ancient North America
      Pyramids. State-of-the-art highways. Productive scientists, artists, and engineers. These, and much more, were ancient North America. But having left no written record, and considered of no value by European conquerors many centuries later, these societies seemed destined to remain a mystery. Now, we are finally able to reveal their fascinating truths. x
    • 2
      The First Human Migrations to the Americas
      DNA evidence points to Asia, and only Asia, as the origin of all human migration to North America. While there were many migration episodes, each episode involved passage across the Bering Strait. Sites of ancient habitation have been found all across the continent, under water and on dry land. See why, even with current technologies, scientists cannot yet agree on the ages of these sites. x
    • 3
      Clovis Man: America's First Culture
      Explore Clovis, the very first American culture, which is identified by the Clovis point, a specialized megafauna-hunting tool that became the most widespread technology in the paleo-world. The Clovis populated the Americas from coast to coast, from Alaska to South America. Although the culture became extinct around 12,000 years ago, you will see how some of the Clovis people evolved into the last Paleo-Indians, the Folsom. x
    • 4
      The Archaic Period: Diversity Begins
      When the megafauna died out across the continent about 10,000 years ago, Paleo-Indian culture began to diversify regionally. Better understand why some groups developed hunting and gathering culture in a seasonal round pattern, while others fished from temporary camps. Also, see what DNA research reveals about one ancient sedentary people with resources plentiful enough to support 350 generations of habitation. x
    • 5
      Late Archaic Innovations
      In this lecture you will see how, about 5,000 years ago, the creative, yet disparate, peoples of North America developed corn agriculture, permanent houses with storage and cooking pits, religion, art, pottery, ceramics, metallurgy, and basket weaving. Further explore the only innovation common to these many different cultures: an increase in cemetery sites and formalized treatment of bodies in burials. x
    • 6
      Poverty Point: North America's First City
      About 3,500 years ago, while most North Americans were still nomadic, see how one group of ancient people developed a planned community on more than 900 acres to accommodate 4,000 to 5,000 inhabitants. Designed with exceptional engineering skills, the fascinating city of Poverty Point functioned for 1,000 years and included one of the oldest pyramids ever built on Earth. x
    • 7
      Medicine Wheels of the Great Plains
      Medicine wheels—wagon-wheel type arrangements of stones on the ground—vary in their number of spokes and size; are difficult to date; and although some are precisely aligned to the solstices, the majority have no known astronomical significance. Survey what we do know about their function and meaning, which almost certainly changed over time, just like the human populations who built them. x
    • 8
      Adena Culture and the Early Woodlands Period
      In modern-day Ohio, the continent's first coherent civilizations evolved about 3,000 years ago, bringing together previously far-flung Archaic practices. Meet the Adena, the first ancient American culture with wide-ranging influence. Known for their conical burial mounds and shared concept of an afterlife, they also might have been the continent's first habitual tobacco smokers. x
    • 9
      The Hopewell and Their Massive Earthworks
      Here Professor Barnhart introduces you to the Hopewell culture, a civilization that thrived for over 700 years. You will see how they influenced all the peoples of eastern North America with trade networks, an art tradition, and the practice of burying their most important dead in earthen mounds. Their knowledge of mathematics and astronomy allowed them to build massive earthwork complexes in sophisticated geometric patterns in present-day Ohio. x
    • 10
      The Origins of Mississippian Culture
      About 1,200 years ago in eastern North America, populations gathered their farms and living structures behind defensive walls. Explore Mississippian culture and see how it introduced an increased use of the bow and arrow along with a large body of art, extensive trade networks, and mythological creation stories remembered today in bits and pieces by a multitude of surviving indigenous nations. x
    • 11
      The Mississippian City of Cahokia
      Covering more than 3,000 acres and with an associated population of about 50,000, understand why Cahokia, the largest ancient city in what is now the US and Canada, became a model for the region. Its fascinating and complex life included stratified social organization, burial mounds, deeply held religious beliefs, sophisticated artwork, woodhenges to mark the solstices and equinoxes—and ritual human sacrifice. x
    • 12
      The Wider Mississippian World
      After the fall of Cahokia, witness how Mississippian civilization flourished across eastern North America with tens of thousands of pyramid-building communities and a population in the millions. Look at the ways they were connected through their commonly held belief in a three-tiered world, as reflected in their artwork. Major sites like Spiro, Moundville, and Etowah all faded out just around 100 years before European contact, obscuring our understanding. x
    • 13
      De Soto Versus the Mississippians
      In 1539, Hernando de Soto of Spain landed seven ships with 600 men and hundreds of animals in present-day Florida. Follow his fruitless search for another Inca or Aztec Empire, as he instead encounters hundreds of Mississippian cities through which he led a three-year reign of terror across the land-looting, raping, disfiguring, murdering, and enslaving native peoples by the thousands. x
    • 14
      The Ancient Southwest: Discovering Diversity
      Uncover what archaeology has revealed about the ancient peoples of the southwestern deserts. Survey the variety of strategies they used depending on their specific locale—from farming in flood plains to building elaborate irrigation canals—and how they developed into multiple distinct, but not isolated, cultures. See why today we recognize three core, and two peripheral, ancient cultures of the area. x
    • 15
      The Basketmaker Culture
      Once natural selection produced a strain of drought-resistant corn, the peoples of the desert gave up their nomadic existence and began to build more permanent structures. Examine the first sedentary cultures of the American Southwest—the possible precursors to the Pueblo—and understand why baskets, which had been invented many thousands of years earlier, significantly increased in importance as the only portable storage solution before the advent of pottery. x
    • 16
      The Mogollon Culture
      As the Mogollon people increased reliance on agriculture, the size and density of their villages also grew, the largest having more than 100 pit houses arranged around multiple kivas. But as you will discover, they're probably best known for their exquisite pottery bowls. Take a look at how, while neighboring cultures were still experimenting with geometric designs, the Mogollon painted sophisticated scenes of animals, humans, and supernatural creatures. x
    • 17
      The Hohokam: Masters of the Desert
      Learn about the Hohokam, a people who made beautiful art, employed cooperative decision making with strong centralized leadership, and developed extensive public architecture. But see why their real claim to fame was building more than 700 miles of sophisticated irrigation canals—the largest and most highly-engineered irrigation system constructed in the Pre-Columbian New World—segments of which are still visible today. x
    • 18
      The Ancestral Pueblo
      The dominant culture of the southwest was the Ancestral Pueblo. For the past 1,300 years, their settlements have exhibited an apartment-like room block pattern, from small farmsteads to cities with thousands of people. Examine how both the architecture and the short lifespans of earlier villages reflected the reality of the area's scarce resource base, promoting cultural traditions born of environmental adaptation. x
    • 19
      The Chaco Phenomenon
      Chaco Canyon contains the most sophisticated architecture ever built in ancient North America—14 Great Houses, four Great Kivas, hundreds of smaller settlements, an extensive road system, and a massive trade network. But who led these great building projects? And why do we find so little evidence of human habitation in what seems to be a major center of culture? Answer these questions and more. x
    • 20
      Archaeoastronomy in the Ancient Southwest
      The people of the ancient Southwest were skilled astronomers, incorporating astronomical alignments in their architecture with impressive displays of light and shadow. Learn how discoveries of the Sun Dagger and the Chimney Rock lunar observatory—as well as the alignment of Great Houses miles apart along lunar maximum lines—could help reveal the true purpose of Chaco Canyon. x
    • 21
      The Periphery of the Ancient Southwest
      As you delve further into the ancient Southwest, you will see why the ancient farming cultures of the region did not spread into surrounding areas where farming was either unnecessary or impossible. Instead, nearby groups lived a more nomadic life, relying on hunting and gathering, and minimal occasional farming. Over time, each group developed its unique artwork, perhaps none as fascinating as the desert Intaglios of the Patayan. x
    • 22
      Late Period Cultures of the Pacific Coast
      From southern California to Alaska, witness a vast array of complex hunter-gatherer cultures that thrived along the Pacific Coast for centuries before European contact. In this most densely populated area of the continent—and its most culturally and linguistically diverse—peoples developed highly stratified societies, sophisticated systems of resource distribution and trade, advanced methods of food storage, and unique artwork. x
    • 23
      Late Period Cultures of the Great Plains
      The peoples of the Great Plains were broadly divided into the bison hunters in the west and the semi-sedentary farmers in the east. But with the European introduction of the horse, gun, and new diseases, you will shift your attention to how each of five main culture areas began to transform and how these changes shaped the homogenized, oversimplified view of American Indian cultures. x
    • 24
      The Iroquois and Algonquians before Contact
      At the time of European contact, two main groups existed in the northeast—the hunter-gatherer Algonquian and the agrarian Iroquois. Delve into how the Iroquois created the first North American democracy as a solution to their increasing internal conflicts. Today, we know much of the U.S. Constitution is modeled on the Iroquois’ “Great League of Peace” and its 117 articles of confederation, as formally acknowledged by the U.S. in 1988. x
  • iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation

    Instructor Molly Birkholm,

    Available Formats: Video Download, Audio Download, DVD, CD

    Tap into the power of a unique form of research-based meditation in the 24 classes and full-length practice sessions of iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation. Alternating between the theoretical and experiential, between the philosophical and the scientific, iRest® trainer Molly Birkholm empowers you with the knowledge and skills to help alleviate everyday stress and life-altering trauma.

    View Lecture List (24)

    Tap into the power of a unique form of research-based meditation in the 24 classes and full-length practice sessions of iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation. Alternating between the theoretical and experiential, between the philosophical and the scientific, iRest® trainer Molly Birkholm empowers you with the knowledge and skills to help alleviate everyday stress and life-altering trauma.

    24 Lectures  |  iRest: Integrative Restoration Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation
    Lecture Titles (24)
    • 1
      Introducing iRest Yoga Nidra
      One of the most important principles in iRest is that of welcoming: inviting you to explore whatever arises as a part of your human experience. Begin your journey with a look at how stress affects the body, the roots of yoga nidra, and the 10 steps of iRest you'll practice throughout the course. x
    • 2
      iRest Foundations: Philosophy and Practice
      Take a closer look at the foundations of iRest from philosophical and practical perspectives. What texts and teachings form the basis of yoga nidra? How do you set up the right practice space? What time of day is the best time to practice iRest? Is it OK to fall asleep during your practice? x
    • 3
      Creating an Inner Resource
      Your Inner Resource is a haven of peace and serenity—a felt sense of well-being deeply rooted inside your body. In this lecture, Ms. Birkholm shows you how to cultivate and connect with your Inner Resource, which is one of the most essential parts of your iRest practice. x
    • 4
      iRest Practice: Inner Resource
      Start tapping into your personal Inner Resource. Join several other students as Ms. Birkholm guides you through a helpful session designed to help you develop an internal experience of well-being that can help you transition from the anxieties of your outside life to the calm of your meditation practice. x
    • 5
      The Power of Intention and Heartfelt Desire
      Two tools you can use to live as your best self (however you define that) are intention and heartfelt desire. Explore these second and third steps of iRest Yoga Nidra as a way to move closer to reconnecting with your true self and living the life you want most. x
    • 6
      iRest Practice: Intention
      Explore your intention and heartfelt desire in this extended iRest practice session. By identifying them at the start of the practice, putting them away, and returning to them again at the conclusion of your practice, you'll perhaps experience these two aspects of iRest Yoga Nidra in entirely different ways. x
    • 7
      Learning to Listen to Your Body
      Learn how to think of your body as a symphony of sensations and signals. After a brief overview of the different layers of consciousness in iRest, focus on the first: the physical body. Benefits of attuning yourself to your body include heightened sensory awareness and pointers into your true nature. x
    • 8
      iRest Practice: Body Sensing
      Practice allowing yourself to receive the different messages your body's trying to send you. As a way to help you explore your body more deeply (and to gauge some of its benefits), this iRest practice session invites you to continually tense and relax your body (physically or mentally). x
    • 9
      Exploring the Power of the Breath
      Ms. Birkholm reveals what your breath can tell you about your health and peace of mind. Start by learning the yogic and scientific perspectives on breathing. Then, turn to breathing exercise techniques you can incorporate into your iRest practice, including breath counting, Ferris wheel breath, and alternate nostril breathing. x
    • 10
      iRest Practice: Breath Sensing
      The focus of this practice session is on a deep meditation using the principles of breath sensing you learned in the previous lecture. Join several other students and see some of the ways sensing and controlling your breath can influence your physical and mental experience during your practice. x
    • 11
      Feelings and Emotions as Messengers
      Another step of the iRest protocol is thinking of your feelings and emotions as “messengers” that tell you how your body and mind are experiencing the world. Learn to differentiate between feelings and emotions, examine the entire spectrum of emotions, and learn to work with opposite emotions. x
    • 12
      iRest Practice: Feelings and Emotions
      Put the previous lecture’s principles, strategies, and insights to use in a helpful meditative experience led by Ms. Birkholm. Welcome different emotions and feelings into your body—whichever ones happen to arise during your iRest Yoga Nidra practice—as if they were simply visitors in your home. x
    • 13
      Finding Deeper Wisdom in Your Beliefs
      In this lecture, Ms. Birkholm shares proactive tools for what you can do when you feel limited by your thoughts. You'll encounter the fundamentals of cognition, the Laws of Opposites and Awareness, and the five kanchukas (or thoughts) that can be found at the root of all human suffering. x
    • 14
      iRest Practice: Beliefs
      Get better acquainted with some of the beliefs you have as a way to become more aware and accepting of your whole experience. Through this helpful iRest practice session, you'll explore ways to use your thoughts and beliefs to direct you toward creating the life you want to lead. x
    • 15
      Discovering Uncaused Joy
      In this lecture, learn ways you can live in a joyous equanimity that exists independent of objects. Through methods including the “three blessings” (writing down three things that went well and why) and “day’s reviews” (reflecting on unfinished events), better realize the ever-present joy in your life. x
    • 16
      iRest Practice: Joyful Well-Being
      How can you better open yourself up to experience peace? It starts with this iRest Yoga Nidra practice session designed to help you cultivate joy. Join Ms. Birkholm and several other students as you, together, tap into the power of the anandamaya kosha stage of iRest. x
    • 17
      Cultivating Awareness
      Turn to the goal of iRest practice: cultivating awareness. Feel into the “I-thought” the same way you do your breathing. Take a closer look at the continuum of awareness, which stretches from your perception of the self as separate to pure awareness, in which all sense of self dissolves. x
    • 18
      iRest Practice: Awareness and Peace
      In this illuminating iRest practice session, you and several other students will take time to explore what it's like to move into witnessing awareness and come closer to fully embodying enlightenment and deep connection in your life. How far along the continuum of awareness can you move? x
    • 19
      Using iRest for Sleep
      Focus on something Ms. Birkholm takes extremely seriously: sleep. First, get tips on turning your bedroom into a sanctuary for sleep. Then, learn two important techniques to help you get a restful night's sleep, and cap it with a brief practice session designed to help you fall asleep. x
    • 20
      Using iRest for Pain Relief
      Walk through the 10 steps of the iRest protocol as they pertain to dealing with chronic pain, whether it's physical (a car accident) or emotional (the loss of a job). Ms. Birkholm shows that, in order to manage pain, you need to approach it from multiple angles. x
    • 21
      Using iRest for Stress Management
      The key to overcoming anxiety, as you'll learn here, is by becoming a source of connection, strength, and resiliency. And this is where iRest plays a critical role. To give you a taste of this, Ms. Birkholm includes a short iRest practice session designed to help you tackle stress. x
    • 22
      Using iRest for Healing Trauma
      Move beyond life's ordinary stressors to look at how iRest can help heal major trauma in your life. Start by going over the basics of how trauma affects the body and mind. Then, examine how you can use iRest principles to integrate your experiences and counteract their traumatic effects. x
    • 23
      The Science behind iRest Yoga Nidra
      What about iRest Yoga Nidra makes it effective? It’s all rooted in the scientific research that supports the practice of iRest and illustrates how and why meditation is so healing. Take a closer look at how the five components of mindfulness—including intention and disidentification—work together. x
    • 24
      iRest Yoga Nidra for Everyday Life
      Conclude the course with a lecture on the tenth step of iRest, during which you come back to life in deep connection with a deep sense of peace. Enjoy a lasting feeling of empowerment at how iRest can help you become the fullest expression of your true self. x
  • Graphic Design Fundamentals

    Instructor Timothy Samara,

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    In Graphic Design Fundamentals, The Great Courses has partnered with CreativeLive to explore the fundamentals of design: form and image, color, type, and layout. You’ll see the creative process in action as your experienced instructor Timothy Samara takes you through five projects step by step, from initial client meeting to final project delivery. Don’t worry if you’ve never learned to distinguish one type style from another—and no special design software is needed. Just open your eyes and enjoy the thrill of the creative process!

    View Lecture List (36)

    In Graphic Design Fundamentals, The Great Courses has partnered with CreativeLive to explore the fundamentals of design: form and image, color, type, and layout. You’ll see the creative process in action as your experienced instructor Timothy Samara takes you through five projects step by step, from initial client meeting to final project delivery. Don’t worry if you’ve never learned to distinguish one type style from another—and no special design software is needed. Just open your eyes and enjoy the thrill of the creative process!

    36 Lectures  |  Graphic Design Fundamentals
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Introduction to Graphic Design
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 1 x
    • 2
      Graphic Design: Areas of Specialization
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 2 x
    • 3
      The History of Graphic Design
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 3 x
    • 4
      The Graphic Designer's Toolkit
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 4 x
    • 5
      The Graphic Designer's Tools: Color
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 5 x
    • 6
      The Graphic Designer's Tools: Typography
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 6 x
    • 7
      The Graphic Designer's Tools: Layout & Space
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 7 x
    • 8
      Typical Work Processes
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 8 x
    • 9
      Designing an Advertisement
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 9 x
    • 10
      Designing a Poster
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 10 x
    • 11
      Designing a Book Layout: Basic Concepts
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 11 x
    • 12
      Designing a Book Layout: The Details
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 12 x
    • 13
      Designing a Website
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 13 x
    • 14
      Designing a Brand Identity: Preparation
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 14 x
    • 15
      Designing a Brand Identity: Showing the Client
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 15 x
    • 16
      Building Brand Language
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 16 x
    • 17
      Designing the Touchpoints
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 17 x
    • 18
      Fundamentals Are Forever
      Module 1: Getting Started - Lesson 18 x
    • 19
      Color Identity
      Module 2: Color - Lesson 1 x
    • 20
      Color Relationships
      Module 2: Color - Lesson 2 x
    • 21
      Palettes & Systems
      Module 2: Color - Lesson 3 x
    • 22
      Color as Meaning
      Module 2: Color - Lesson 4 x
    • 23
      Form & Image Toolbox
      Module 3: Form & Image - Lesson 1 x
    • 24
      Media & Stylization
      Module 3: Form & Image - Lesson 2 x
    • 25
      Representation & Manipulation
      Module 3: Form & Image - Lesson 3 x
    • 26
      Visual Narrative & Metaphor
      Module 3: Form & Image - Lesson 4 x
    • 27
      Typography: The Basics
      Module 4: Type - Lesson 1 x
    • 28
      Style: Choosing & Mixing
      Module 4: Type - Lesson 2 x
    • 29
      Text-Setting Mechanics
      Module 4: Type - Lesson 3 x
    • 30
      Styles: Visual Qualities of Text
      Module 4: Type - Lesson 4 x
    • 31
      Interactions of Forms in Space
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 1 x
    • 32
      Arrangement, Logic & Rhythm
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 2 x
    • 33
      Contrast & Hierarchy
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 3 x
    • 34
      Unifying Type & Imagery
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 4 x
    • 35
      Working with Grids (or Not)
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 5 x
    • 36
      Bringing It All Together
      Module 5: Layout - Lesson 6 x
  • Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language

    Professor Michael Carasik, Ph.D.

    Available Formats: Video Download, DVD

    Get an authoritative primer on a fascinating ancient tongue with Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language. Covering everything from the Hebrew alphabet and punctuation marks to essential vocabulary words to advanced grammatical rules, Professor Michael Carasik’s 36 lectures equip you to read one of the world’s greatest books in its original language on your own.

    View Lecture List (36)

    Get an authoritative primer on a fascinating ancient tongue with Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language. Covering everything from the Hebrew alphabet and punctuation marks to essential vocabulary words to advanced grammatical rules, Professor Michael Carasik’s 36 lectures equip you to read one of the world’s greatest books in its original language on your own.

    36 Lectures  |  Biblical Hebrew: Learning a Sacred Language
    Lecture Titles (36)
    • 1
      Studying Biblical Hebrew
      Use the word “hallelujah” as a gateway to exploring the three different components of the Biblical Hebrew writing system: letters, vowels, and diacriticals. Then, start learning Hebrew the natural way with a look at Genesis 1:3 and the first thing God does in creating heaven and Earth. x
    • 2
      Learning the Aleph Bet
      Get to know the letters of the Hebrew alphabet, and how Biblical Hebrew is pronounced. Surprises include the silent letter aleph (the first letter of “God”), the tricky letter samekh, which resembles an “o” but sounds like an “s,” and nearly identical pairs of letters such as gimel and nun. x
    • 3
      The Tiberian Vowel System
      The Tiberian system of marking vowels in Hebrew has been used exclusively for more than 1,000 years. In this lecture, discover the signs that mark short and long vowels, and learn how vowels can change their spelling (and, slightly, their sound) without changing their meaning. x
    • 4
      Roots of Semitic Verbs
      Every Hebrew verb, and almost every noun and adjective, is based on a root, a group of three (or sometimes two) consonants. Here, Professor Carasik teaches you how to begin recognizing the roots of verbs in Biblical Hebrew—then discusses how God is referred to in the Hebrew Bible. x
    • 5
      Hebrew Verb Forms and the Definite Article
      Get an introduction to the five different Hebrew verb forms: finite, infinitive, adjective, participle, and imperative. Plus, learn three ways of identifying something as definite (rather than indefinite): by using the definite article (ha), by labeling it with a personal pronoun, and by naming it. x
    • 6
      Hebrew's Attached Prepositions
      Explore three Hebrew letters that attach to the beginning of other words to create a new word. Then, armed with this new knowledge, read your first complete paragraph in Biblical Hebrew from start to finish: the story of the first day of creation in Genesis 1:1-5. x
    • 7
      Adjective Forms and Agreement in Hebrew
      Unlike English, Hebrew adjectives have four forms, not one—and they must agree with their nouns based on whether they’re singular or plural, and masculine or feminine. Learn the four forms of adjectives (tov, tovah, tovim, tovot), several adjectives, and two ways to put nouns and adjectives together. x
    • 8
      Irregular Hebrew Nouns and Adjectives
      Sometimes it’s the simpler nouns that are the most likely to surprise you. Examine several of the most common non-obvious nouns (irregular nouns) and adjectives (demonstratives) in Biblical Hebrew. These include family names (daughter, son, brother), as well as “this” (zeh, zot) and “these” (éleh). x
    • 9
      Hebrew Pronouns and Pronominal Suffixes
      Hebrew has a ton of different pronouns. In this lecture, get an introduction to pronouns like “I” (ani, anokhi) and “we” (anaḥnu), as well as three different flavors of pronominal suffixes. Then, practice your new skills with a Bible verse describing the fourth day of creation. x
    • 10
      How Hebrew Letters Behave
      What do different letters do differently? Here, take a comprehensive look at the different ways Hebrew letters behave and start deciphering words in Biblical Hebrew that you don't already recognize. Topics include guttural letters (the orneriest consonants in the Hebrew language) and roots that start with yud. x
    • 11
      Perfect and Imperfect Hebrew Verbs
      Focus on two of the five forms of Biblical Hebrew verbs: the perfect and the imperfect, both of which have person, gender, and number. The perfect, as you'll learn, is always marked by endings. The imperfect, however, is marked by prefix letters as well: aleph, nun, tav, and yud. x
    • 12
      Segholate Nouns and Pausal Forms
      Turn now to segholate nouns—nouns that feature seghols (“-eh” vowels). By looking at segholate nouns in real Hebrew phrases from the Bible, you’ll start to get more comfortable with what Professor Carasik calls the “EH-eh rhythm” and the various grammatical forms that use the pattern. x
    • 13
      The Construct Form: Hebrew's Trailer Hitch
      By allowing you to attach another noun to your first noun, the construct form acts as a sort of trailer hitch in Biblical Hebrew. Once attached, the first noun in construct “belongs” to the second. Here, learn construct forms by revisiting the first and fourth day of creation. x
    • 14
      Forming Hebrew Construct Chains
      Continue your study of construct forms with prepositions in Biblical Hebrew that are combinations of simple prepositions you’ve already learned (example: lifnei, or “before”). Then, look at irregular nouns with unusual construct forms whose frequent occurrence makes them critical to understanding Biblical Hebrew. x
    • 15
      Hebrew Verb Classifications: Binyanim
      In Biblical Hebrew, the binyan acts as a sort of stem or conjugation for verbs. Get a re-introduction to verbs with their binyan identification, learn how the binyanim got their names, and focus on a single root in different binyanim to get a feel for what the binyanim do to a verb's meaning. x
    • 16
      Question Words in Hebrew
      From mi (“Who?”) and lama lo (“Why not?”) to eikh (“How?”) and matai (“When?”), discover how to recognize the words that tell you when a question is coming up in Biblical Hebrew. Why is this so important? Because there’s no such thing as a question mark in Biblical Hebrew. x
    • 17
      Hebrew Participles
      Return to the verbal system with Professor Carasik's helpful explanation of the third of the five Hebrew verb forms: the participle. One of the ways you'll master the verbal adjective in Biblical Hebrew is by working your way through Genesis 22:7. x
    • 18
      Counting in Hebrew
      In this fun lecture, start to count in Hebrew, from one to 10,000. You’ll learn a children’s rhyme for counting from one to four, the construct form of numbers, the ordinal numbers, some helpful shortcuts such as how to refer to a “pair” of something, and more. x
    • 19
      Hebrew Roots with Guttural Letters
      Focus your attention here on categories of verbs from the Qal binyan with roots whose guttural letters (hey, het, and ayin) tend to “misbehave.” Central to this lecture are three rules about how gutturals behave, as well as relevant examples in passages from the Hebrew Bible. x
    • 20
      Hebrew's Lamed-Hey Roots
      Lamed-hey roots are those roots where, in the dictionary, the third radical of a verb (the lamed) is a hey. Here, learn how to work with some of the most common lamed-hey roots, including banah (“build”), ḥayah (“live”), anah (“answer”), panah (“turn”), and kalah (“be over”). x
    • 21
      Hebrew's Roots Beginning with Yud
      Roots that begin with yud are plentiful in Hebrew—and very common. Professor Carasik walks you through a list of some of the most common first-yud verbs, including yada (“know”), yatza (“go out”), yarash (“take possession”), and yashav (“settle”). x
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      Irregular Hebrew Verbs
      Very few verbs in Hebrew are irregular. Those that are, as you’ll learn here, are not very difficult—but they do work a little differently than what you’re used to seeing. In this lecture, learn how to master irregular Hebrew verbs by focusing on them individually. x
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      Hebrew's Hollow Verbs
      Welcome to what may be the strangest verb roots of all: those that have only two consonants, not three. Here, explore the general rules about these hollow verbs, and build a list of commonly used hollow verbs you can refer to when reading Biblical Hebrew. x
    • 24
      The Infinitive in Hebrew
      The infinitive verb form is used to describe the action of a verb (as in “There’s a time to rend … and a time to mend.”). Professor Carasik walks you through the different infinitive forms, then guides you through Ecclesiastes 3—what he calls the “mother lode” of the Hebrew infinitive. x
    • 25
      Jussives, Cohortatives, and “Hava Nagila”
      Explore how Biblical Hebrew expresses intention (as in phrases like yehi or, or “Let there be light.”). You’ll encounter jussives, which are only found in lamed-hey, hollow, and Hiphil verbs; and cohortatives, which invite collective action (as in the famous song, “Hava Nagila”). x
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      The Imperative Form in Hebrew
      Turn now to the imperative form in Hebrew and the simplest way to think of it (in the Qal): by taking off the tav prefix from second-person imperfect verbs. You'll learn imperatives from a variety of weak and strong verbs, and use your skills to work through several biblical verses. x
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      Verbs of the Hiphil Binyan
      Focus on a new binyan: Hiphil, which can be thought of as the causative binyan. (One example: l’haqtir, or “to burn incense.”) Then, go back to Genesis, collect a list of Hiphil infinitives, and see what the different root categories do when you put them into this Hiphil shape. x
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      Piel Verbs and Passive Binyanim
      Take a closer look at another major binyan: the Piel. The goal of this lecture is to give you the skills to distinguish this binyan when you need to, so you can learn the verbs as they come along. Then, examine two more binyanim: the passives Pu'al and Hophal. x
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      Reflexive Binyanim: Niphal and Hitpa'el
      Conclude your survey of the seven different binyanim by taking a closer look at two reflexive patterns: the Niphal and the Hitpa’el. Along the way, Professor Carasik introduces you to an important root that appears only in these two binyanim: nun-bet-aleph, or “to be/act like a prophet.” x
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      Reading the Bible in Hebrew: Joshua 1
      Now you're ready to start reading longer passages in the Bible in Hebrew. Here, follow Professor Carasik as you read Joshua 1:1-9, which deals with God's charge to Joshua. You'll translate the text, talk about the passage's meaning, and spend time parsing every single verb it contains. x
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      Geminate Verbs and Reading Numbers 22
      In this lecture, explore geminates: roots where radicals two and three are the same. Along the way, you'll learn how to spot these common two-letter combinations, consider a fascinating example from Ezekiel's vision of the messianic future Temple, and begin reading Numbers 22 from start to finish. x
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      Hebrew's Object Suffixes
      You've seen object suffixes in previous lectures. Now, focus on them directly. You'll learn some obvious (and not-so-obvious) combinations of verbs and object suffixes, and ponder some questions about phrases and sentences in the Bible that appear more than once, but with slight variations. x
    • 33
      Hebrew Oaths and Other Idioms
      Study idioms that are common in Biblical Hebrew, but sound strange when translated into English. You’ll explore different ways to take an oath in Biblical Hebrew, the customary way to state someone’s age, and the danger of “crossing the mouth” of the Lord. x
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      Understanding Hebrew Punctuation Marks
      In the Hebrew Bible, every word has a punctuation mark that serves three functions: telling you where the accent falls, indicating how to chant the text musically, and telling you how to group words in a sensible way. Use this knowledge to move forward in your reading of Numbers 22. x
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      Choosing a Hebrew Bible
      What's the best Bible from which to read Hebrew? Professor Carasik offers insights and recommendations on four printed Bibles as well as several electronic sources, and shows you how to navigate your way to a specific chapter and verse in an all-Hebrew Bible. Close by resuming your reading of Numbers 22. x
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      Helpful Hebrew Reference Books
      Look at some essential Hebrew reference books out there (besides biblical translations and commentaries), including reference grammars and three major Biblical Hebrew dictionaries. Close out the course by completing your line-by-line reading of Numbers 22. x