Professor Barbara J. King, Ph.D.

Professor Barbara J. King
  • The College of William and Mary
  • University of Oklahoma
Scientific creationism, however, and even the newer doctrine of intelligent design, are fundamentally at odds with the bedrock principles of biological anthropology, and of science itself.

Dr. Barbara J. King is a biological anthropologist and Chancellor Professor of Anthropology at The College of William and Mary in Virginia. She earned her B.A. in Anthropology from Douglass College, Rutgers University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Professor King's research interests concern the social communication of the great apes, the closest living relatives to humans. She has studied ape and monkey behavior in Gabon, Kenya, and at the Language Research Center at Georgia State University. The recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, she has published three books on anthropology, including The Information Continuum: Social Information Transfer in Monkeys, Apes, and Hominids. At William and Mary, Professor King has won four teaching awards: The William and Mary Alumni Association Teaching Award, the college's Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award, the Virginia State Council of Higher Education for Virginia's Outstanding Faculty Award, and the designation of University Professor for Teaching Excellence, 1999-2002.

Testimonials

"Though having difficult material to work with, this Professor King has been able to present her discourse in a lucid fashion, at the same time giving fair treatment to the many areas of controversy."

 

"Professor King presented the material at an accessible level for learning.  Viewpoints in opposition to the professor's were presented professionally, respectfully and without denigrating holders of these views."

 

"Professor King's enthusiasm for her subject has inspired me to continue reading other books on the topic. With the solid foundation that she provides, it's easy to move forward to learn more."

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11 Courses and Sets