Professor Sean Carroll, Ph.D.

Professor Sean Carroll
  • California Institute of Technology
  • Harvard University
We need to push on our understanding of cosmology, particle physics, gravity, not to mention how complexity and entropy evolve through time, and eventually you’ll be able to really understand what our theories predict.

Professor Sean Carroll is a Senior Research Associate in Physics at the California Institute of Technology. He earned his undergraduate degree from Villanova University and his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Harvard in 1993. Before arriving at Caltech, Professor Carroll taught in the Physics Department and the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, and did postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Professor Carroll is the author of Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity, published in 2003. He has taught more than 200 scientific seminars and colloquia and given more than 50 educational and popular talks. In addition, he has written for numerous publications including Nature, New Scientist, The American Scientist, and Physics Today. Professor Carroll has received research grants from NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation, as well as fellowships from the Sloan and Packard foundations. He has been the Malmstrom Lecturer at Hamline University, the Resnick Lecturer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a National Science Foundation Distinguished Lecturer. While at MIT, Carroll won the Graduate Student Council Teaching Award for his course on general relativity. In 2006 he received the Arts and Sciences Alumni Medallion from Villanova University.

Testimonials

"Dr. Carroll is an excellent instructor. He is able to bring complex theory to the "common" woman in an understandable fashion. He is interesting, not pretentious, and a pleasure to listen to. Very interesting."

 

"Dr. Carroll's presentation of the course was outstanding. He consistently described complicated physical phenomena in the clearest and easy to understand terms, frequently using relevant and helpful analogies."

41 Courses and Sets

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41 Courses and Sets